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Northwestern University

Get ahead. Explore. Enjoy.

College students, high school students and those seeking professional development or personal enrichment will find many ways to get ahead, explore, enjoy and learn this summer.

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Summer Courses for Visiting Students

Each summer Northwestern University welcomes visiting students from other universities who take advantage of Summer Session's convenient open enrollment to access more than 300 undergraduate courses, including intensive sequences that enable students to earn a full year of credit in biology, chemistry, physics or a number of foreign languages. Get ahead on credit towards your degree or simply try something new. Summer courses are flexibly scheduled, ranging from three to eight weeks and taught during the day, evening and on weekends.







Summer Session Courses

Accounting
ACCOUNT 202-DL Introduction to Managerial Accounting

A continuation of the introduction to accounting, with emphasis on providing relevant and timely accounting information and analysis to managers for use in planning, decision making, and controlling strategic operational objectives. Topics include the classifications of costs and different ways of reporting and analyzing those costs; the operating budgeting process; capital budgeting; and job-order, standard, process, and activity-based costing systems. Prerequisite: ACCOUNT 201.

This course is conducted completely online. The hours listed reflect the weeekly online office hours facilitated by the course instructor.

The course requires a $75 technology fee.

Summer 2014 Sec #10 (202-DL)
06/25/14 - 08/27/14 W 6 – 9 p.m.
Online Open Caesar ID: 41858
ACCOUNT 208-DL Income Tax I

Introduction to the field of taxation, with attention to individual income taxation. Gross income, capital gains, deductions, and alternate tax methods. IRS forms used. Prerequisite: ACCOUNT 202.

This course is conducted completely online. The hours listed reflect the weeekly online office hours facilitated by the course instructor.

The course requires a $75 technology fee.

Summer 2014 Sec #10 (208-DL)
06/23/14 - 08/25/14 M 6 – 9 p.m.
Online Open Caesar ID: 41120
ACCOUNT 210-DL Intermediate Accounting I

Accounting theory and concepts; analysis of special problems that arise in applying these underlying concepts to financial accounting. Accounting information as a basis for decisions by management, stockholders, creditors, and other users of financial and accounting reports. Prerequisite: ACCOUNT 202.

This course is conducted completely online. The hours listed reflect the weeekly online office hours facilitated by the course instructor.

The course requires a $75 technology fee.

Summer 2014 Sec #10 (210-DL)
06/24/14 - 08/26/14 Tu 6 – 9 p.m.
Online Open Caesar ID: 41121
ACCOUNT 310-DL Managerial Cost Accounting

Managerial uses of cost data in planning, controlling, and evaluating organizational activities and in making business decisions. Topics include discussion of activity-based costing, standard costs, inventory costing, and review of cost allocation techniques. In addition, contemporary topics, including pricing decisions, balanced scorecard, and capital budgeting techniques will be discussed, along with ethical and behavioral issues addressing both manufacturing and service sectors. Pre-requisite: ACCOUNT 202

This course is conducted completely online.

The course requires a $75 technology fee.

Summer 2014 Sec #10 (310-DL)
06/26/14 - 08/28/14 Th 6 – 9 p.m.
Online Open Caesar ID: 41859
ACCOUNT 390-DL Research and Communication

CPAs are required to conduct research when performing tax, accounting, and auditing services. The successful accountant will not only be able to access and utilize online databases but also concisely convey their findings to clients and third parties using proper grammar and punctuation. This course introduces the type of research the professional will encounter in their practice and covers the available research databases and steps to conduct such research. Also covered are communication techniques, grammar, and punctuation. Students who plan to take the CPA exam after July 1, 2013, will need to demonstrate that they have covered this subject in their course work.

This course is conducted completely online. The hours listed reflect the weeekly online office hours facilitated by the course instructor.

The course requires a $75 technology fee.

Summer 2014 Sec #10 (390-DL)
06/23/14 - 08/25/14 M 6 – 9 p.m.
Online Open Caesar ID: 41162
ACCOUNT 390-DL Topics in Accounting: International Accounting

This course covers accounting issues uniquely confronted by companies involved in international business. The primary focus of the course is to provide an overview of international accounting by drawing on real business problems, economies, and finance in order to understand what is contained in and how to develop and interpret financial reports. The course includes fundamental financial accounting concepts and methods across countries.

This course is conducted completely online. The hours listed reflect the weeekly online office hours facilitated by the course instructor.

The course requires a $75 technology fee.

Summer 2014 Sec #23 (390-DL)
06/25/14 - 08/27/14 W 6 – 9 p.m.
Online Open Caesar ID: 41860
African American Studies
AF_AM_ST 378-0 Harlem Renaissance

The end of World War I ushered in an era where many artists and intelligentsia were attempting to emancipate and destroy the ideologies of Victorianism and view their society with the stark and brutal truth. While the United States was attempting to liberate itself from the dominance of European culture during the 1920s, African Americans were also attempting to culturally define themselves. The failure of the Reconstruction coupled with the guise of limitless Northern opportunity and equality, sparked the movement known as the Great Migration--where hundreds of thousands of Southern African Americans relocated to the major cities of the North. In fact, much of New York's cultural dominance in the 1920s was directly linked to Harlem being the chief mecca to the multitudes of emigrating Southern African Americans. Harlem did not become the “Harlem” that we currently recognize it to be until the 1920s when it became the African American metropolis.

This seminar will be an intensive examination of the literature, music and visual art produced during the Harlem Renaissance --from 1917 to 1934. We will also explore the philosophical and cultural critiques offered by the African American intelligentsia of the period. Not only will this course introduce all of the major male figures of the period, but will also focus on the rich artistic production left by the women of the Harlem Renaissance.

The main objective of this course will be to provide a clear understanding of how these artists established a personal and collective identity based on the explorations and expressions of their cultural lineage. In addition to the primary texts, we will also include important secondary resources as well as contemporary recordings, visual art and documentaries.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/25/14 - 07/30/14 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 42024
AF_AM_ST 380-0 Introduction to African American Photography

Nineteenth and Twentieth Century black photographers changed visual representations of African Americans when they began producing photographs that constructed black life through a black lens. These images served in part as a response to disturbing, negative images of blacks that had been created by white photographers. This course is designed to investigate the ways in which black photographers disrupted and transformed accepted distorted snapshots of the lives and history of African Americans. We will examine images of black families, southern migration, poverty, historical movements, and the ways in which photographs provide positive and engaging images of African American educators, political leaders, business entrepreneurs, and blacks in the entertainment industry. The visual power of photo documentaries and photo narratives are also topics that will be explored in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #14
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Cancelled Caesar ID: 40173
African Studies
AFST 276-0 African Literature in Translation: From Oral Tradition to Contemporary Film Studies

The course offers a comparative study of African arts media--oral performance, writing, electronic recording--and of different arts performance genres within African oral traditions--which have an unbroken connection to contemporary writing and publishing, as well as radio, TV, and film production on the Continent. Theoretical-analytical approaches to the appreciation of verbal arts and film forms are based on the writings of Prof. Harold Scheub of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Creative works explored in the course range from Yoruba divination poetry to stories from the Arabian Nights to epic traditions like that of the West African Mandekan hero Sunjata Keita; there will also be screenings of and work on four feature-length films. Texts for study are offered in English translation, and the films with African-language sound tracks are subtitled. Course resources will be accessible, and work will be submitted, through a (web-based) Learning Management System (LMS)--either Blackboard or Canvas, to be determined. Besides composing and submitting short essays and medium-length midterm (folktale analysis) and final (epic analysis) research "papers," there will be two projects that involve presenting research using the course's LMS site's blog and wiki platforms respectively. Successful completion of the course satisfies one of the Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences' distribution (general education) requirements in the Literature and Fine Arts; and can be counted as a core elective in the African Studies major and minor, and a non-Western literature required course within the Comparative Literary Studies major. The course may also be of interest to students in the fields of Performance Studies and Digital Humanities research.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41856
Anthropology
ANTHRO 213-0 Human Origins

This course will examine the evolution of the human species and explore the nature of human biological variation in the modern world. Principles of evolutionary theory and genetics will first be presented to provide a framework for the study of human evolutionary biology. The fossil evidence for human evolution will then be considered using comparative data from nonhuman primate ecology to help reconstruct prehistoric lifeways. Finally, the influence of environmental stressors (e.g., climate, nutrition, and disease) on modern human biological variation will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to how human populations have utilized biological and behavioral mechanisms to adapt to their environments throughout evolutionary history. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40148
ANTHRO 214-0 Archaeology: Unearthing History

Archaeology is a discipline that requires both physical and intellectual work. Archaeology is partly the discovery and excavation of houses, monuments, treasures, burials - material aspects of past human experience - as well as meticulous scientific analyses to learn about material culture that people left behind. Archaeologists need to exercise creative imagination to paste together the multitude of fragments of the past to get a better understanding of human history.


During the course we will explore a wide range of questions, theories and methods that are in the forefront of archaeological research. We will use examples from around the world: state formation and colonization in Peru, everyday life and warfare among the Maya, monumental architecture at Copan, salt production and imperial expansion of the Aztecs, ritual practice and burial mounds at Cahokia, emancipation and ceramic production in the Caribbean, chiefs in Bronze Age Denmark, castles of medieval England, forts and cremations in Bronze Age Hungary. These case studies, covering the range of interests and expertise of archaeologists in the NU Department of Anthropology, will illustrate how we study societies.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 4 – 6:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41862
ANTHRO 390-0 Topics: The Evolution of Human Sexuality

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Tiris course explores human sexuality and reproduction in
terms of biological evolution. It address such questions as: Does the human species fit predictions from Darwinian sexual selection theory? Does culture erase the effects of our evolutionary history on sexual and reproductive behavior? Why do sexual and reproductive behavior vary so widely among different cultural traditions? Some of the material is controversial.
EVALUATION METHOD: Two examinations (short answer and essay format), class
participation, and a book review.
BOOK REVIEW: In addition to the above readings and examinations, each student will be required to select a book relevant to the course and write a 1 000-word review of that book.
REQUIRED TEXTS:
1. Daly, Martin and Margo Wilson. 1983. Sex, Evolution, and Behavior, Second Edition.
2. Bobbi Low, Why Sex Matters, 2000.
3. Pinker, Susan. 2008. The Sexual Paradox. New York: Scribner.
4. Spiro, Melford. 1966. Gender and Culture: Kibbutz Women Revisited. Duke U. Press
OTHER REQUIRED READING
1. Henry F. Lyle III and Eric A. Smith, "How Conservative Are Evolutionary
Anthropologists," Human Nature, August 2012. (On Blackboard)
2. William Irons, "The Naturalistic Fallacy" Mss. (On Blackboard)

Summer 2014 Sec #21
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m. 1810 Hinman 104
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40290
Art
ART 150-0 Introduction to Photography

This course is an introduction to photographic equipment, materials, and processes that includes extensive darkroom instruction in black-and-white printing and creative darkroom control. The aesthetics of camera vision are explored through classroom discussion and lectures. This is an intensive workshop-style class consisting of two six-hour sessions each week with 30-minute lunch breaks. Attendance at the first class meeting is required, and students must come equipped with a 35mm film camera that can be operated with all automatic settings off. Bring one roll of Kodak TriX film to the first class. No previous studio experience required. Enrollment is limited to 12. Students must bring a 35mm camera that can be operated manually and a roll of Tri-x 400 b&w, 36 exp. film to first class.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/16/14 MW 9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40082
Astronomy
ASTRON 101-0 Modern Cosmology

The modern Big Bang perspective on the origin, structure, evolution, and fate of the universe. Topics to be discussed include the extragalactic distance scale, the Hubble expansion, the large-scale clustering of galaxies, cosmic inflation and the early universe, Big Bang nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background radiation, dark matter, dark energy, and the recent evidence for acceleration in the expansion of the universe. This course counts toward the Weinberg College Natural Sciences distribution requirement, Area I. This distribution course is designed for nonscience majors.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 9 – 11 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40149
ASTRON 120-0 Highlights of Astronomy

Building from fundamental physical principles of gravity, light and matter, this course will explore our modern ideas about the solar system, stars, galaxies, and the universe. We will explore two primary themes: the origin and destiny of the universe and the search for life within it. The course incorporates online presentation of interactive content and collaborative conversation combined with in-class demonstrations and discussion. No previous college background in math or science is required. The hybrid class will meet each week and will require participation in on-line discussion. The classroom is scheduled to match a regular 6 week summer class and students should reserve the time in their schedules. However, actual class time will be reduced and will be replaced by asynchronous discussion boards and other collaboration. 

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m. Tech. Institute
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40243
Biological Sciences
BIOL_SCI 165-CN Introduction Human Physiology

Functions and interrelationships of organ systems of the human body. Cells, organs, and body systems; deviations from normal functions; the diseased state. May not be taken for credit while or after taking any part of BIOL SCI 210-A, B, or C. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/12/14 Tu 6 – 9:15 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40990
BIOL_SCI 170-CN Concepts of Biology

Fundamentals of biology. Chemical composition and organization of living material, cellular organization, energy conversion by organisms, genetics and reproduction, ecology, evolution, and other topics. Student-designed project work. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/12/14 Tu 6 – 9:15 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40971
BIOL_SCI 202-0 Human Evolutionary Biology

How are humans similar to and distinct from other organisms? This course examines human biological adaptations across a range of bodily systems from an evolutionary perspective. Areas of human biology emphasized will be the brain and special senses; skin structure and function; digestion, diet and the excretory system; respiration and circulation; reproduction, sexual dimorphism and sexual selection; cranial and postcranial musculoskeletal structure; and growth and life history adaptations. The evolutionary context involves brief consideration of processes and patterns of evolution, the origins of human biological systems, and discussion of human population genetics and history, including an understanding of biological variation. The goal of the course is to develop a broad understanding of human biology in an evolutionary context. Prerequisite: BIOL SCI 103-0 or 164-0, or equivalent basic familiarity with biology and evolution, or permission of instructor.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40240
BIOL_SCI 215-0 Genetics and Molecular Biology

Principles of inheritance; methods used to study gene function; mechanisms by which DNA is replicated, transcribed into RNAs, and translated into proteins; basics of the process of natural selection.

CHEM 102 or 172.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 9 – 10:30 a.m. Tech
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41863
BIOL_SCI 216-0 Cell Biology

 

Mechanisms that cells use to compartmentalize and transport cellular materials, to move, to regulate growth and death, to communicate and to respond to their environments.

Prerequisite: CHEM 103 or 172

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.


Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 8 – 10:30 a.m. Tech Institute
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41864
BIOL_SCI 217-0 Physiology

Fundamental mechanisms underlying the function of the major organ systems in mammals will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying physiological processes, and on the integration among the major organs systems to achieve homeostatic and sensorimotor function. Topics will include neural, renal, cardiovascular, respiratory and autonomic/somatic motor physiology.

PLEASE NOTE: This class starts on Tuesday, July 8 and runs through Thursday, August 14.

Prerequisite:  CHEM 103 or 172, plus MATH 220

Summer 2014 Sec #20
07/08/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 11 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Tech
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41865
BIOL_SCI 218-0 Biochemistry

BIOL SCI 218-0. Biochemistry. Basic concepts in biochemistry, emphasizing the structure and function of biological macromolecules, fundamental cellular biochemical processes, and the chemical logic in metabolic transformations. Prerequisites:  CHEM 210-1 or 212-1

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Tech Institute
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40312
BIOL_SCI 220-0 Genetics and Molecular Processes Laboratory

Students will design their own laboratory experiment using a defined model. Laboratory techniques and experiments in fundamental aspects of transmission genetics and molecular biology will be used.

Please note: this lab earns credit of .34 unit of credit and the corresponding tuition applies.

 

Prerequisites:  CHEM 103 or 172

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/10/14 TuWTh 2 – 5 p.m. Tech
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41866
BIOL_SCI 221-0 Cellular Processes Laboratory

Students will design their own laboratory experiment using a defined model. Laboratory techniques and experiments in fundamental aspects of cell biology will be used.

Prerequisites:  CHEM 103 or 172

Please note: this lab earns credit of .34 unit of credit and the corresponding tuition applies.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
07/15/14 - 07/31/14 TuWTh 2 – 5 p.m. Tech
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41867
BIOL_SCI 222-0 Physiological Processes Laboratory

Experiments, and some independent projects, to elucidate the functioning of organisms at cellular, tissue, and organ system levels.

Prerequisites: CHEM 103 or 172, plus MATH 220

Please note: this lab earns credit of .34 unit of credit and the corresponding tuition applies.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
08/05/14 - 08/21/14 TuWTh 2 – 5 p.m. Tech
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41868
BIOL_SCI 313-CN Human Anatomy

Introduction to human anatomy. System approach to anatomical organization. Sections of the body; musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Embryology development. Lecture course supplemented by selected prosections of human cadavers and dry exercises using bones, models, and computer animations. Prerequisite: BIOL SCI 165, 170, or equivalent course. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40986
BIOL_SCI 313-DL Human Anatomy

This course is conducted completely online. This is a course directed at the introduction of human anatomical form and organization. Body structure will be studied with a regional approach and will involve a primarily gross anatomical study with supplementary histological and clinical material where relevant. Form-function relationships will be emphasized. Topics covered will include: anatomical terminology, cells and tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. The systems will be covered as they are encountered in the regional approach. Readings are assigned from the Marieb, Wilhelm and Mallatt text. The course requires a $75 technology fee. Prerequisite: BIOL SCI 165, 170, or equivalent course. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #28 (313-DL)
06/23/14 - 08/16/14 M Time: TBA
Online Open
BIOL_SCI 328-CN Microbiology

This course provides an introduction to bacteria with an emphasis on their impact on human health and society. Topics covered include bacterial morphology/structure, physiology, and metabolism, in addition to the principles of bacterial replication, and basic bacterial genetics. Practical applications of bacteriology and bacteriological research are explored, including genetic engineering and biotechnology. Studies are made on the impacts of microorganisms on human health include a discussion of bacterial pathogenesis, current challenges regarding antimicrobial resistance, and the human microbiome. Students have an opportunity to explore current topics in microbiology of interest. BIOL SCI 210-A, -B, -C, or equivalent basic familiarity with biology and evolution. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/25/14 - 08/13/14 W 6 – 9:15 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41153
Business Institutions
BUS_INST 239-0 Marketing Management

This course offers students an introduction to basic principles and applications of marketing management. In addition to being guided through the marketing process, students will develop analytical and business skills in preparation for future employment. Market research, consumer behavior, market segmentation, target marketing, brand positioning, distribution channels and service marketing are among the topics discussed. Regular quizzes ensure that students keep up on the reading and remember the core concepts, while a group project gives students the opportunity to apply these concepts to an existing business problem.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40226
BUS_INST 390-0 Special Topics in Business Institutions - Managing Risk

A useful benchmark in economics is the model of perfect competition, which assumes many buyers and sellers, homogeneous products, free entry and exit, no externalities or public goods, perfect information, and no transactions costs (or trading complications). When one or more of these conditions are violated, we anticipate some degree of market failure, and non-trivial cases may warrant government intervention. This course focuses on information problems: risk is uncertainty that matters due to adverse consequences. The world is fraught with risk, but fortunately, there are a variety of approaches that allow firms - and by extension, households, governments and other organizations - to identify and measure risk, and then use cost-benefit analysis to determine how to best manage it through avoidance, transfer, limited exposure, or impact reduction. General goals pursued throughout this course are to: -Stimulate your interest in risk management as a means of improving your decisions. -Familiarize you with media jargon to enhance your ability to follow the news. -Practice writing and speaking about current events from an economics perspective. -Develop your economic literacy by using our tools of analysis (graphs, algebra, equilibrium, constrained optimization, comparative statics). -Deepen your understanding of the roles of government and markets in reducing various risks. -Prepare you for post-Northwestern life by enabling you to manage risk in your future potential roles as a consumer, producer, job seeker, citizen, parent, investor, etc.

Summer 2014 Sec #27
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 6:30 – 8:20 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Chicago Field Studies
CFS 291-0 Analysis of the Field Experience

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

This course is designed to provide students an academic framework to observe, analyze and critique their respective internship experiences. The course will provide a critical approach to organizations from the study of structure, roles, power, gender, race and ethnicity, diversity and teamwork. We will examine the intersections, alliances and points of departure within these texts regarding the lived behavior of people working with organizational environments. Students will exchange points of view and engage in online discussions about their work experiences and critical reflection on those experiences.
Notes: Class taught on Blackboard

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/22/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40191
Summer 2014 Sec #38
06/23/14 - 08/22/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40254
CFS 391-0 Field Studies in Social Justice

Students participate in one class, which focuses on key issues surrounding race, gender, and violence as they pertain to the Chicago area. In the course, students will examine the factors that place individuals at risk for victimization and perpetration. Students will unpack some of the myth and realities about violence and focus on the different racial/class/gender discourses that surround the issues. Finally, students will also explore some of the interventions that have been developed to address various forms of violence. Internships serve as sites for original research. Discussions and assignments examine course readings in light of this research.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/18/14 M 5 – 8 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41889
CFS 393-1 Field Studies in the Modern Workplace Culture

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

This course explores a variety of theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of the modern workplace. Using both classic and contemporary readings, the seminar will investigate structures, strategies, and managerial processes in organizations. Class discussions, which are led primarily by the students, focus on reviewing the key concepts from the readings and examining them in light of students' experiences at their internships.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/18/14 M 10 – 11:30 a.m. 1813 Hinman 103
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40158
CFS 393-2 Contemporary Issues in the Workplace

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

This is a companion research methods course to Organizational Behavior. For the purposes of this program, the internship serves as a site for research, and this course will give students the tools to systematically research the culture of their organizations. The study of organizations comprises diverse methodological approaches. This course will emphasize three major qualitative methods used to study organizations: ethnography/participant observation, interviews, and document analysis (the study of written materials). Students will learn the basics of each method and then use them to conduct research at and on their internship organizations.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/18/14 M Time: TBA 1813 Hinman 103
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40159
CFS 394-1 Legal Field Studies: Legal Process and Culture

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

This course involves theory and research. It explores a variety of theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of the modern workplace, focusing specifically on the legal profession. Using both classic and contemporary readings, the seminar will investigate structures, strategies, and managerial processes in organizations. The course also treats the internship as a research site. Students research their organizations using qualitative research methods that they are taught in class, such as participant observation, interviews, and document analysis. Class discussions, which are led primarily by the students, focus on reviewing the key concepts from the readings and examining them in light of their internship research.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/18/14 M Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40160
CFS 394-2 Legal Field Studies: Contemporary Issues in Law

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

This course analyzes different issues that agitate the legal profession and provide students with the tools to assess critically the evolution of the American legal system. The class covers topics ranging from issues of migration and asylum, to national security and counterterrorism law as well as capital punishment and inequality. The goal of this class is to provide students with the tools to investigate how laws are made and how they evolve through diverse avenues for political and legal changes. To explore these issues, the students will rely on the methodologies of research introduced in Organizational Behavior such as interview, participant observation and academic research techniques.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/18/14 M Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40161
CFS 395-1 Business Field Studies: Business Workplace Culture

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

Students participate in two separate classes: Business Workplace Culture and Contemporary Issues in Business. What goes on in the workplace is about much more than just doing work. Work is a real day-to-day activity but it is also an ideal that is moral, ethical, imagined, or ignored. This course explores the organizational and cultural forms of work and the modern business workplace. Every single business has a culture—no business is without defining characteristics of organizational structures, ideas, and agendas. Here, the internship experience provides clearly defined knowledge and tangible skills—but it also provides ongoing opportunities to analyze and learn from the intangibles that are common (though in different ways) to every work experience. The diversity of internships generates a variety of comparative perspectives. This class asks you to develop an understanding of workplace culture in your own terms.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/22/14 M 5 – 6:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40162
CFS 395-2 Business Field Studies: Contemporary Issues in Business

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

Students participate in two separate classes: Business Workplace Culture and Contemporary Issues in Business. What goes on in the workplace is about much more than just doing work. Work is a real day-to-day activity but it is also an ideal that is moral, ethical, imagined, or ignored. This course explores the organizational and cultural forms of work and the modern business workplace. Every single business has a culture—no business is without defining characteristics of organizational structures, ideas, and agendas. Here, the internship experience provides clearly defined knowledge and tangible skills—but it also provides ongoing opportunities to analyze and learn from the intangibles that are common (though in different ways) to every work experience. The diversity of internships generates a variety of comparative perspectives. This class asks you to develop an understanding of workplace culture in your own terms.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/22/14 M 6:30 – 8 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40163
CFS 397-0 Field Studies in Civic Engagement: Engage Chicago

CFS 397-0 (Field Studies in Civic Engagement: Engage Chicago) is designed for participants in the Engage Chicago summer program. Participants in CFS 397-0 will learn from top Northwestern faculty as well as prominent leaders within the Chicago community. The course will offer an opportunity to study the theory and research that underlie the hands-on work students are doing in the field. Course format will combine lectures, readings, presentations by local experts, student assignments, class discussions, and field experiences. The course content will include urban studies, contemporary social issues, community development and theories and methods of social change - including an examination of both historical and current issues in Chicago. Students in CFS 397-0 will examine the complexities of major American cities; become familiar with important social change and community development strategies; gain exposure to and understanding of contemporary social issues; and examine ways to utilize their own skills and abilities to enhance their own learning while contributing to the public good.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40203
CFS 398-0 Field Studies in Humanities

Need department consent to enroll in this course.

While interning at humanities-based institutions, organizations, and companies across the Chicago area, students in this class will explore the significance of the humanities in American society today and the possibilities for charting a career in the humanities. This course will introduce students to a wide range of critical issues in the public humanities-a field that is rapidly growing as humanist scholars probe and promote the complex interplay between the humanities and the public. Case studies, readings, and assignments will focus students' attention on a series of Chicago spaces and programs-including their internship sites-that force us to consider what we mean when we talk about "the humanities" and "the public." Students will examine the decisions that people like curators, directors, librarians, and public officials must make in designing and supporting these institutions, and in promoting the humanities in civic life.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/22/14 M 5 – 8 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40275
Chemistry
CHEM 101-0 General Chemistry

The first in a three-course sequence in college-level chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation for more advanced chemistry courses such as organic chemistry and physical chemistry and as the general chemistry preparation required for professional schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. Descriptive chemistry, elements, and compounds; basic chemical calculations, stoichiometry, and solution concentration; gas laws.


Chemistry 101-0 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 121-0.) on Tuesday/Thursday, 1-5pm. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.


Prerequisite: one year of high school chemistry and algebra or consent of instructor.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SCS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF
Lab: T/Th
9 a.m. – noon
1-5:00pm
Tech Institute LR3
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40001
CHEM 102-0 General Inorganic Chemistry

The second in a three-course sequence in college-level chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation for more advanced chemistry courses such as organic chemistry and physical chemistry and as the general chemistry preparation required for professional schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. Thermochemistry; descriptive chemistry; inorganic reactions; chemical bonding; condensed phases; phase equilibria, solutions, and colligative properties. 

 

Chemistry 102-0 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 122-0.) on Tuesday/Thursday, 1-5pm. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.


Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 101-0 or course deemed equivalent by department/instructor with a grade of C- or better.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SCS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF
Lab: T/Th
9 a.m. – noon
1-5:00pm
Tech Institute LR3
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40002
CHEM 103-0 General Physical Chemistry

The third in a three-course sequence in college-level chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation for more advanced chemistry courses such as organic chemistry and physical chemistry and as the general chemistry preparation required for professional schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. Chemical equilibria; equilibria in aqueous solution, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, metal complexes, and solid-state chemistry.

 

Chemistry 103-0 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 123-0.) on Tuesday/Thursday, 1-5pm.  The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.


Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 102-0 or course deemed equivalent by department/instructor with a grade of C- or better.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SCS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF
Lab: T/Th
9 a.m. – noon
1-5:00pm
Tech Institute LR3
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40003
CHEM 121-0 General Chemistry Lab

General Chemistry Lab. Students enrolled in Chem 101-0 must also register for Lab 121-0 section 33. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.

Summer 2014 Sec #33
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MW 1 – 5 p.m. Tech
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40365
CHEM 122-0 General Inorganic Chemistry Lab

General Inorganic Chemistry Lab. Students enrolled in Chem 102-0 must also register for Lab 122-0 section 33. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.

Summer 2014 Sec #33
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MW 1 – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40366
CHEM 123-0 General Physical Chemistry Lab

General Physical Chemistry Lab. Students enrolled in Chem 103-0 must also register for Lab 123-0 section 33. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250.

Summer 2014 Sec #33
08/05/14 - 08/21/14 MW 1 – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40367
CHEM 210-1 Organic Chemistry

The first of a three-course sequence in organic chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation required for professional and graduate schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. Tuition is billed on a per-course basis. Basic concepts of structure, stereochemistry, and reactivity of organic compounds. The chemistry of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols. Prerequisite: one year of general chemistry with laboratory or consent of instructor.

 

Chemistry 210-1   ONLY, the laboratory section is part of the Chemistry 210-1 course and does not bear .34 units of credit.Separate registration is not required for the lab portion of this class. See class sequence timeline diagram.


Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 103-0 or course deemed equivalent by department/instructor with a grade of C- or better. Alternatively, one year of general chemistry with laboratory as deemed equivalent by department/instructor.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SCS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2014 Sec #23


Course Materials:

Please see the notes for Organic Chemistry 230-2 and 230-3. The co-requisite lab for 210-2 starts on June 23, 2014. If you intend to register for 230-2 at a later date, you should be aware the corresponding lab starts 3 weeks earlier than the lecture.

06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute LR2
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40004
CHEM 210-2 Organic Chemistry

The second of a three-course sequence in organic chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation required for professional and graduate schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. The chemistry of carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids, and their derivatives; structure proof by spectroscopy; reaction mechanisms.


Chemistry 210-2 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 230-2) that meets on Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:00-5:30pm in Tech D220. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250, as long as student remains enrolled in the lecture.  The 230-2 lab meets from Monday, June 23 - Monday, July 21. See class sequence timeline diagram.

 

Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 210-1 or course deemed equivalent by department/instructor with a grade of C- or better.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SCS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF
Lab: MW 6/23-7/21
9 a.m. – noon
1-5:30pm
Tech Institute LR2
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40006
CHEM 210-3 Organic Chemistry

The third in a three-course sequence in organic chemistry for science majors, serving as preparation required for professional and graduate schools. Because of the intensive nature of these courses, it is recommended that students not register concurrently for other courses. The chemistry of aromatic compounds, amines, and polyfunctional compounds of biochemical and medical interest.

 

Chemistry 210-3 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 230-3) that meets on Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:00-5:30pm in Tech D220. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250, as long as student remains enrolled in the lecture. Lab 230-3 meets from Wednesday, July 23 - Wednesday, August 20. See class sequence timeline diagram.

 

Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry 210-2 or course deemed equivalent by department/instructor with a grade of C- or better.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I. Due to limited space in chemistry courses during Summer Session, priority is given to visiting, degree-seeking, and certificate (Professional Health Careers) students. SCS students-at-large may register starting on June 10 if space is available.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/20/14 MTuWThF
Lab: MW 7/23-8/20
9 a.m. – noon
1-5:30pm
Tech Institute LR2
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40007
CHEM 230-2 Organic Chemistry 210-2 lab

Please Note: this lab starts on June 23, three weeks prior to the beginning of Organic Chemistry 210-2. Chemistry 210-2 students MUST also enroll in the laboratory class (CHEM 230-2) that meets on Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:00-5:30pm in Tech D220. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250. See class sequence timeline diagram.

Summer 2014 Sec #33


Schedule Notes:

Please Note: this lab starts on June 23, three weeks prior to the beginning of Organic Chemistry 210-2.

06/23/14 - 07/21/14 MW 1 – 5:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40369
CHEM 230-3 Organic Chemistry 210-3 lab

Please Note: this lab starts on July 23, approximately 1 and 1/2 weeks prior to the beginning of Organic Chemistry210-3. Chemistry 210-3 students MUST also enroll in this laboratory class (CHEM 230-3) that meets on Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:00-5:30pm in Tech D220. The Chemistry lab is worth .34 units of credit and has an additional lab fee of $250. See class sequence timeline diagram.

Summer 2014 Sec #33


Schedule Notes:

Please Note: this lab starts on July 23, approximately 1 and 1/2 weeks prior to the beginning of Organic Chemistry 210-3.

07/23/14 - 08/20/14 MW 1 – 5:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40368
Chinese

Introduction to the Summer Course

This three-course sequence (111-1, 2, 3) presents the material of the first year of the beginning Chinese curriculum in an intensive format over nine weeks, introducing the Pinyin system, grammar, and about 500-600 characters. The 150-minute-class meets 5 times per week, and provides a practical learner-centered curriculum, with the aim to help true beginners develop their communicative competence in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, while gaining competence in Chinese culture, making connections to their daily life, and building links among communities.

Students who successfully complete Summer Elementary Chinese 111-3 with the final course grade of C- or above may continue with the second-year Chinese (CHINESE 121-1) at Northwestern University.

CHINESE 111-1 Elementary Chinese

The first course in the Elementary Chinese sequence introduces the standard Chinese phonetics system-Pinyin, the Chinese writing system, basic grammar, and simple sentence structures. Speaking, listening, character, grammar, and communicative exercises are included throughout the course.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF noon – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40231
CHINESE 111-2 Elementary Chinese

The second course in the Elementary Chinese sequence focuses on developing basic communicative skills and knowledge of the Chinese culture. There will be extensive student-oriented practice in pronunciation, conversations, listening comprehension, and sentence structures in class.

Prerequisite: Chinese 111-1 with a grade of C- or above.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF noon – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40232
CHINESE 111-3 Elementary Chinese

Chinese 111-3 is the third section of the summer class. It aims to help students obtain an adequate grasp of basic language skills in both spoken and written Chinese and lay a good foundation for further study of this language. Speaking, listening, character, grammar, and communicative exercises are included throughout the course.

Prerequisite: Chinese 111-2 with a grade of C- or above.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF noon – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40233
Information Systems
CIS 212-CN Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming

This course focuses on developing complex programs using an object-oriented language. Students write programs that utilize functions and methods for code modularization and arrays for solving problems. Information hiding, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, exception handling, and other principles of object-oriented programming will be introduced. May not be audited or taken P/N. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/11/14 M 6 – 9:15 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41123
CIS 350-CN Strategic Information Systems

This course examines current issues, themes, and research related to the strategic use of information systems in organizations at a high level. It focuses on the use of information and information technology for competitive advantage in businesses, organizations, and nonprofits. The management of information as a resource and information systems planning and its relationship to strategic planning are discussed. Cases are used to illustrate the use of information systems to gain a competitive edge. Both successful and failed IT systems and projects, past and present, are studied. Topics include the use of strategic information systems for competition, business-IT alignment, global IT issues and outsourcing, knowledge management, and strategic information systems investment and evaluation. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. This course is open to Leadership and Organization Behavior year two cohort students only. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2014 Sec #24
08/09/14 - 08/30/14 Sa 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40996
Classics
CLASSICS 260-0 Classical Mythology: Greek Mythology

The ancient Greeks understood their myths as traditional tales about the origins of the world, the gods, human society, and institutions as well as about the relationship between gods and mortals. Some myths, in particular, constitute an invaluable anthropological basis for investigating the Greeks' attempt to define themselves in opposition to a whole series of "others," including the divine, the feminine, and the foreign. Through a selection of mythological narratives involving gods and goddesses, legendary heroes and heroines, Centaurs, Gorgons, Amazons, exemplars of feminine virtue, and barbarian enchantresses, students examine how the Greeks used the divine/human, male/female, Greek/barbarian dichotomies to shape their notions of "self" and "otherness" and mark the boundaries between what they perceived as "us" and what they categorized as "them." This course counts toward the Weinberg College literature and fine arts distribution requirement, Area VI.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 2:30 – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40094
CLASSICS 320-0 Topics in Ancient History: The Foundation of Rome: Myth and History

By investigating the genesis and development of the legendary traditions concerning the beginnings of Rome, this course provides a wide-ranging exploration of how the history of early Rome was shaped through centuries. What do the stories of Aeneas, Romulus and Remus, the Sabine women, the rape of Lucretia and the expulsion of the kings from Rome tell us about the way the Romans conceived of their past? How did these legends aim at providing mythic justification for the centrality of Rome to the history of the Mediterranean world? Besides engaging questions which are central to understanding the politics of Roman identity at various stages of the city's growth and expansion, students will learn about important archaeological discoveries of the last half-century which have revolutionized our thinking about the origins of Rome. This course counts toward the Weinberg College historical studies distribution requirement.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40302
Communication Related Courses
CMN 110-0 Chicago/Evanston Internship

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2014 Sec #21
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40914
CMN 110-0 Internship/New York

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2014 Sec #22
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40908
CMN 110-0 Internship/Los Angeles

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40909
CMN 225-0 Internship/ Chciago/Evanston

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2014 Sec #21
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40910
CMN 225-0 Internship/New York

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2014 Sec #22
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40911
CMN 225-0 Internship/Los Angeles

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40912
CMN 340-0 Internship: Evanston

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2014 Sec #21
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40919
CMN 340-0 Internship/ New York

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2014 Sec #22
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40920
CMN 340-0 Internship/ Los Angeles

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40921
CMN 340-0 Internship: Extra Credit

Summer 2014 Sec #40
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40918
CMN 410-0 MFA Internship/ Field Studies

Students participate in off-campus experiential learning in companies related to their communication major. Enrollment by application in advance through EPICS office.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40868
Communication Studies
COMM_ST 205-0 Theories of Persuasion

Survey of major theories that explain how to change another person's attitudes and behaviors. Applications to persuasion within a variety of contexts, including relationships, organizations, legal campaigns, and the mass culture. Fulfills a core requirement of the communication studies department. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 1:30 – 4 p.m. Frances Searle 2107
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40841
COMM_ST 205-CN Theories of Persuasion

This course surveys major theories that explain how to change another person's attitudes and behaviors. Applications to persuasion within a variety of contexts are covered, including relationships, organizations, legal campaigns, and mass culture. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. This course is open to Leadership and Organization Behavior year one cohort students only.

Summer 2014 Sec #24
08/09/14 - 08/30/14 Sa 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41016
COMM_ST 250-CN Team Leadership and Decision Making

This course examines theories and research relating to the various processes by which leaders make decisions, affect group behavior, and engage groups in a variety of task- and strategy-related outcomes. Group communication is stressed, with a particular emphasis on change and conflict. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. This course is open to Leadership and Organization Behavior year one cohort students only. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/28/14 - 07/26/14 Sa 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41017
COMM_ST 343-0 Health Communication

The purpose of this course is to understand how communication can enhance and maintain the well-being of citizens in intentional health care contexts.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open
COMM_ST 395-0 Food, Communication & Culture

Food can seem like the most mundane and banal aspect of our everyday lives, but it is much more than the simple sustenance of a meal on the table. In addition to fueling our bodies, it is a powerful form of communication, a means to construct individual identity and to connect with others, and a way to create a shared culture as well as strengthen social ties. In recent years, food has also become a crucial aspect of modern media production through an explosion of books, magazines, blogs, television programs, and feature films devoted to the subject. A rapidly increasing volume of media are dedicated to the depiction and exploration of cooking and eating

In this seminar, we will explore multiple aspects of food as communication, with an emphasis on food-related media platforms. We will consider such topics as: How do food practices and beliefs shape and make meaning of the world? How do ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, and religion shape food choices? How does food function to foster a community’s identity? What role do the media play in framing and shaping food practices? Our goal throughout this class will be to gain insights into the powerful and prevalent ways that our relationships with food communicate and negotiate our identities and cultures.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40942
COMM_ST 395-SA The Theory and Practice of Community Engagement

his course focuses on helping teams of external consultants support and bolster local community development efforts by focusing on identifying and harnessing existing community assets. It includes practical lessons in asset mapping and frameworks for maximizing intra- and inter-team relationships. The course continues throughout the summer with field-based experiential learning in international community consulting and development. During the seven-week immersion, student teams will put community consulting theory into practice while working with host nonprofits to develop small scale projects. This experience will provide students hands-on learning that no amount of classroom discussion could replace. Weekly updates to Professor Arntson, in-country staff, and a Northwestern TA will allow for constant feedback and reflection. Students take this course as part of the Global Engagement Studies Institute summer study abroad program. This course will be taught in Evanston before students begin field work abroad, and again once students return.


Enrollment is by application only. Applications accepted until March 1st, 2014. Please visit www.gesi.northwestern.edu to learn more and apply. NOTE CLASS DATES: 6/16/14-6/22/14 AND 8/17/14-8/19/14.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/16/14 - 08/19/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open
Comparative Literature
For related classes, please see the departments of English, French, Italian, and Slavic Languages and Literature.
COMP_LIT 304-0 Sacrifice in Utopia/Dystopia

The question of what an ideal society is, and conditions that make it possible, have occupied the minds of thinkers and writers for centuries. The connection between apocalyptic scenarios and the establishment of 'perfect' societies has haunted many writers and readers in different times and places. This course offers a study of utopia/dystopia through a comparative survey of classical and contemporary literature and film. By looking at texts from philosophical discourses to science fiction and films in a variety of languages and genres, we'll try to answer questions like: how is utopia treated in different cultural traditions? How does dissatisfaction with the status quo give rise to thoughts of a perfect society? When does utopia become a dystopia? What limitations do utopias come with? How does sacrifice fit in with actualizing a utopia? What are the repercussions of utopian thought in the real world?

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41890
Music: Performing Organizations
CONDUCT 282-4 Summer Community Chorus

The Summer Chorus will perform Carmina Burana by Carl Off in the version for two pianos and percussion, preceded on the first portion of the concert by the first movement of Bernstein’s Chichester Psalms, and selected short choral works.

If you are interested in singing in the Summer Chorus, contact Stephen Alltop, Northwestern University Bienen School of Music, 711 Elgin Road, Evanston, IL 60208. Phone 847-491-2299 or email swa440@northwestern.edu.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/31/14 MTh 7 – 9:45 p.m. MAB 109
Evanston Campus Open
Communication Sciences and Disorders
CSD 301-DL Anatomy and Physiology of the vocal Mechanism

This course is conducted completely online. The course will be asynchronous, which means that students can participate in discussions and complete assignments by working at their own pace, as long as deadlines are met. The course covers anatomical and physiological mechanisms of breathing, phonation, and articulation. Laboratories include dissection and participation in physiological research. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above.

The course requires a $75 technology fee.

Summer 2014 Sec #29 (301-DL)
06/23/14 - 08/16/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open Caesar ID: 41197
CSD 305-DL Phonetics

This course is conducted completely online. The course will be asynchronous, which means that students can participate in discussions and complete assignments by working at their own pace, as long as deadlines are met. The course focuses on training in transcription of English speech sounds. Introduction to phonological analysis, dynamics of articulation, and dialect variations.

The course requires a $75 technology fee.

Summer 2014 Sec #29 (305-DL)
06/23/14 - 08/16/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open Caesar ID: 41198
CSD 318-DL Introduction to Audiology

This course is conducted completely online. The course will be asynchronous, which means that students can participate in discussions and complete assignments by working at their own pace, as long as deadlines are met. The course is an introduction to the measurement of hearing in humans, covering the basic anatomy of the ear, measurement of hearing, potential disorders of hearing. Lecture/laboratory.

The course requires a $75 technology fee.



Summer 2014 Sec #26 (318-DL)
06/23/14 - 08/16/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open Caesar ID: 41891
CSD 388-0 Attention Deficit Disorder and Related Behavior Disorders

An examination of the role of attentional processes in normal learning and a historical overview of the field of attention deficits. Diagnosis of attention deficit disorder, its primary symptoms, associated conditions, and etiologies. Consideration of a variety of treatment approaches including medication, family systems intervention, and social skills training.

Summer 2014 Sec #21
06/16/14 - 06/20/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40834
CSD 392-DL Language Development and Usage

This course is conducted completely online. The course will be asynchronous, which means that students can participate in discussions and complete assignments by working at their own pace, as long as deadlines are met. The course focuses on the development of spoken and written language as it relates to child development; includes phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic components, as well as cultural and individual linguistic diversity.

The course requires a $75 technology fee.

Summer 2014 Sec #26 (392-DL)
06/23/14 - 08/16/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open Caesar ID: 41892
CSD 396-1 Diagnostic Procedures

Evaluation of speech and language disorders. Interviewing, report writing; use of standardized tests; examination of speech sensory and motor functions. Prerequisite: CSD 392, and senior standing or above, or permission of instructor.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/15/14 MW
Friday
1 – 2:45 p.m.
1:00-1:50pm
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40923
CSD 415-2 Clinical Study

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 3 – 4:45 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40836
CSD 415-6 Clinical Externship

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 2 – 3:45 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40850
CSD 417-0 Noise and Its Effect on People

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 11:30 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40847
CSD 426-0 Evaluation and Treatment of Balance Disorder

Electrophysiologic evaluation of auditory, visual and somatosensory systems, emphasizing electric response measures. Theoretical and practical considerations in clinical application; interpretation of test results.

 

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 8 – 10 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40835
CSD 435-0 Neuromotor Speech Disorders

Neuropathologic factors affecting motor speech control: acoustic, perceptual, physiologic, and neurologic correlates, Differential diagnosis and management of dysarthric, apractic, and abulic speech syndromes, Pre-requisite: CSD 435. Note: lab required.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 8 – 10 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40902
CSD 439-0 Management of Feeding Disorders in Infants and Toddlers

Developmental sequence of feeding skills in infants/toddlers; anatomy and physiology of swallowing, respiratory and gastrointestinal systems; psychological impact of feeding disorders; comparison of atypical oral sensory motorpatterns, and feeding and swallowing behaviors across various pediatric disorders; treatment. Prerequisite: CSD 438-1.

Summer 2014 Sec #21
06/16/14 - 06/20/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40903
CSD 440-0 Alternative and Augmentative Communication

Theories and practices in clinical management of severely impaired or nonspeaking persons. Application of graphics, signs, and gestural means of communication; use of aids and devices; development of interactive communication behaviors; development and use of computer-assisted communication strategies. Lectures, laboratory, and independent study/project.

Summer 2014 Sec #24
06/23/14 - 07/17/14 MTuWTh 4 – 6 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40833
CSD 441-0 Infant and Toddler Assessment

Principles involved in the process of assessment; issues that impact on diagnosis; standardized assessment instruments; and informal assessment techniques. All domains of development are included -cognition, speech and language, motor skills, and affective development.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/13/14 MW 5 – 7 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40925
CSD 465-0 Hearing Impairment

Principles and practices in rehabilitation of children and adults, including use of sensory aids, counseling, and communication remediation, emphasizing speech reading, and auditory training techniques.

Summer 2014 Sec #24
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 MTuWTh 9:30 – 11:15 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40957
CSD 465-DL Hearing Impairment

This course is conducted completely online. The course will be asynchronous, which means that students can participate in discussions and complete assignments by working at their own pace, as long as deadlines are met. The course focuses on principles and practices in rehabilitation of children and adults, including use of sensory aids, counseling and communication remediation, emphasizing speech reading and auditory training techniques.

The course requires a $75 technology fee.

Summer 2014 Sec #26 (465-DL)
06/23/14 - 08/16/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open Caesar ID: 41893
CSD 487-0 Advanced Issues in Literacy Disorders

This course will provide theoretical perspectives on typical and atypical development of literacy skills. Current and historical models of reading and written language and their implications for instruction will be presented. Efficacy-based interventions and the use of technology will be addressed.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 3 – 5:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40906
CSD 491-2 Advanced Articulation and Phonological Disorders in Children

Advanced study of research in the evaluation and treatment of articulation and phonological disorders in children. Application in the design of treatment protocols.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/26/14 - 08/14/14 Th 6 – 8 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40958
CSD 494-2 Advanced Study in Disorders of Fluency

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/12/14 Tu 6 – 8 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40952
CSD 570-3 Seminar: Capstone Project

Development and execution of project relevant to clinical audiology. First Quarter: critical review of clinical research. Second Quarter: research methods for audiology. Third Quarter: professional writing and communication.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/16/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41894
Economics
ECON 201-0 Introduction to Macroeconomics

Scarcity and choice; elements of demand and supply; determinants of aggregate output, employment, inflation, growth, and balance of payments. Prerequisites: ability to do algebra and draw graphs. This course counts toward the Weinberg College social and behavioral sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 1 – 2:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40008
ECON 202-0 Introduction to Microeconomics

Consumers' and producers' influences on structure of output and prices and distribution of income. Social efficiency in resource allocation. Government impact on allocative efficiency and distributive equity. Prerequisite: ECON 201. This course counts toward the Weinberg College social and behavioral sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 11 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40009
ECON 281-0 Introduction to Applied Econometrics

Estimation and analysis of a variety of empirical econometric models. Descriptive statistics, univariate regression, multiple regression, simultaneous equations, and forecasting. Prerequisite: ECON 201, 202; MATH 220; STAT 210; or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 9 – 10:50 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40010
ECON 308-0 Money and Banking

The course studies the role that money and interest rates play in the operation of the U.S. economy. The aim is to give students an overview of the U.S. financial system and an understanding of the theory and practice of monetary policy. The topics will be a blend of theoretical modeling and empirical/historical discourses.

Prerequisite ECON 281, 310-1, 311

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Jacobs 3245
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40262
ECON 309-0 Public Finance

Theory and practice of public finance. Welfare aspects of taxation and public expenditure decisions. Budgeting, public investment, external costs and benefits, and public debt. Prerequisites: 281, 310-1,2.

Summer 2014 Sec #309-0
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 3 – 4:50 p.m. Jacobs 3245
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41869
ECON 310-1 Microeconomics

Consumer behavior and the theory of demand; production, cost, supply functions; choices under uncertainty, insurance; competitive equilibrium; subsidies, taxes, price controls; monopoly and monopsony. Prerequisites: 201, 202, MATH 220.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 9 – 10:50 a.m. Jacobs 3245
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40011
ECON 310-2 Intermediate Microeconomics

Price discrimination and public utility pricing; monopolistic competition, oligopoly, duopoly models; game theory; factor demands; general equilibrium theory and welfare economics; information theory; externalities and public goods. Prerequisite: 310-1.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 3 – 4:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41870
ECON 311-0 Macroeconomics

Macroeconomics and monetary policy. Behavior of economy as a whole. Income, inflation, unemployment, and growth; consumption, investment, and rate of interest; monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: 201, 202, MATH 220.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/30/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 11 a.m. – 12:50 p.m. Jacobs 3245
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40303
ECON 339-0 Labor Economics

Survey of economic problems growing out of employment relationships; theories and processes of wage and employment determination, income distribution, and the role of trade unions and issues of economic security. Prerequisites: 281, 310-1,2, 311.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 1 – 2:50 p.m. Jacobs 3245
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41871
ECON 349-0 Industrial Economics

Industrial Economics Price and efficiency performance of American industries representative of various types of market structures and practices. Prerequisites: 281, 310-1,2.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 1 – 2:50 p.m. Jacobs 3245
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40227
ECON 362-0 International Finance

Determination of exchange rates, balance of payments, and international asset flows and prices; international transmission of macroeconomic disturbances. Prerequisites: 281, 310-1, 311.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 9 – 10:50 a.m. Jacobs 3245
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40304
ECON 370-0 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

Externalities and the role of property rights, pollution, waste disposal, common property problems, renewable resource management, nonrenewable resource use and depletion, recyclable resources, water allocation, and management of public lands. Prerequisites: 281, 310-1,2.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 3 – 4:50 p.m. Jacobs 3245
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41872
English
Composition courses ENGLISH 110 and ENGLISH 111 are only open to School of Continuing Studies students and visiting students. Please see English Requirements for information about prerequisites and placement exam procedures for these courses.
ENGLISH 105-0 Expository Writing

Expository Writing is designed for any student who wants a strong introductory course in college-level writing. Students write three essays, developing each through a process of planning, drafting, revising, and editing. Through this process, students learn techniques for writing essays that are clear, concise, interesting, and well-supported. Class meetings are conducted as seminar discussions and workshops.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40305
ENGLISH 111-CN Writing Seminar II: Living Digital

Nearly every aspect of our daily lives is shaped by digital technologies that didn't exist 20 years ago. That's not news, but change has been so rapid that we've barely had time to ask what kind of world we have created. Are we now safer, smarter, happier, more democratic? Or have we become more ignorant, isolated, indifferent and anxious? And will any of those answers still be true next month? In this course we'll begin by looking at research into how technology has changed us, then students will pursue their own research-based explorations into its effect on how we work, play, buy, think, learn, love, and express ourselves. Prerequisite: ENGLISH 110 or equivalent. SCS students taking English 111-CN should also review the SCS writing requirements. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40972
ENGLISH 113-CN Introduction to Literature

Introduction to the vocabulary, techniques, and pleasures of literature through close study and discussion of poems, plays, short stories, and novels. Short critical papers develop ability to analyze and interpret literature. Prerequisite: ENGLISH 111 or equivalent writing skills highly recommended. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40973
ENGLISH 205-0 Intermediate Composition

This course is for students with some college writing experiences who want to write more effectively and develop their ability to critique their own work. Students will write and revise several short essays and one medium-length paper. Readings and class discussions will address how to manage the process of writing in different situations, and how to benefit from other writers' advice. Teaching methods: group discussions, peer-review workshops, and individual conferences. May not be audited or taken P/N.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40306
ENGLISH 205-CN Intermediate Composition: Business Communication

This course is designed for those who have experience with college-level writing but who want to sharpen their writing and communication skills. Students learn to apply measures of excellence in business writing and communication. Assignments relate to business environments, including audience analysis, persuasive writing, verbal and interpersonal communication, and document design, and graphics. Writers gain experience writing in collaborative environments. Students produce multiple drafts and receive feedback from their peers and the instructor. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2014 Sec #25
06/26/14 - 07/24/14 Th 6 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40989
ENGLISH 208-CN Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction

This course explores a number of creative nonfiction forms, including personal essay, biography and autobiography, criticism, and creative analysis. Students write several short essays and one long essay, discuss the work of outside authors and fellow students in a workshop format, and participate in discussions and exercises on such matters as style, point of view, and critical thinking. May not be audited or taken P/N. Advanced composition class and strong basic writing skills highly recommended. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41046
ENGLISH 313-0 Studies in Fiction: The World Novel

What if you awakened to find that you had become a huge insect?--that no one else in your family has been thus afflicted?---but that there is no other change in the external world? This is the hypothesis of a short novel by Franz Kafka that explores the 'logic' of a nightmare that cannot be reversed, and which has influenced several generations of 20th-century writers to posit characters who confront the irrational. Starting from a reading of Kafka's The Metamorphosis, and his novel The Trial, continuing through short novels by the French experimentalist Georges Perec (Things), by Japanese writer Kobo Abe (The Woman in the Dunes), by Italo Calvino (The Baron in the Trees), by the South African J. M. Coetzee (Waiting for the Barbarians), and by the Colombian Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Chronicle of a Death Foretold), we will study the changes made in fiction by writers who introduce a bizarre fate into places and lives that are, for the most part, ordinary. We will also look at two more recent explorations of characters lost in labyrinths of seeming coincidence written by W. G. Sebald and Christoph Ransmayr. Students will write one mid-term in the third week and three short papers.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 9:30 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41873
ENGLISH 339-0 Special Topics in Shakespeare: Law and Order in Shakespeare

Popular culture today is rife with police procedurals that put audiences in the position of armchair legal experts exercising their judgment upon the characters onscreen. The works of William Shakespeare offered a similar experience to Renaissance theater-goers and readers during a time recognized by historians for its litigiousness and drastic legal change. This course considers how literary representations of crime and the legal system reveal the values, fears, sympathies, and investments of Shakespeare’s cultural milieu. How do these plays depict complicated legal issues, from seemingly mundane marriage contracts and business agreements to serious crimes like murder and revenge? How do gender, race, and class inform portrayals of criminals and victims? What place does bias have in the Renaissance court of law? If time permits, we will also explore these ideas through selections from modern film adaptations like The Merchant of Venice (dir. Michael Radford, 2004) and Hamlet (dir. Kenneth Branagh, 1996).

Selected reading list: The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, Hamlet, The Winter’s Tale, The Rape of Lucrece

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 9:30 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40307
ENGLISH 368-0 Studies in 20th Century Literature: The Poetics of Breakthrough

When does a literary genius become a literary genius? Does an unsuccessful product preclude an unsuccessful process? What can be learned from looking at the less-than-brilliant works of brilliant writers? Are there situations in which the early drafts of work of literature are superior to the final draft? Throughout this course, we will consider these questions while looking at passages from major texts like James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dorothy Allison’s Bastard Out of Carolina alongside the work they wrote on the brink of these accomplished works of literature--Allison’s Trash stories and Joyce’s Stephen Hero. Is there only early genius in the first collection of Adrienne Rich's poetry, or is her creative prowess fully realized? We will look at a poem or two as they changed in the several editions of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. We’ll consider Sylvia Plath’s early imitative work followed by the confessional poems rising out of the personal events in the early 1960’s. And we will inquire of Marinetti and Breton, what is the difference between a manifesto and a declaration? Through these works, we will discuss the mechanisms of literary celebrity and how it changes over time, the power and drama of revision, and elisions and omissions in what’s finally called “the text”. Along the way, we’ll look at examples in visual art (Pollock and Kandinsky), music (Stravinsky, Richard Strauss), and consider the artist who turned one project, like Leaves of Grass or Tom Phillips’ A Humument, into a lifetime project.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40172
ENGLISH 378-0 Studies in American Literature: The Chicago Way

Urbanologist Yi Fu Tuan writes “What begins as undifferentiated space becomes place when we get to know it better and endow it with values.” In The Untouchables, Sean Connery tells Kevin Costner, “You want to get Capone? Here’s how you get Capone. He pulls a knife, you pull a gun. He puts one of yours in the hospital, you put one of his in the morgue. That’s the Chicago way!” In this class, we will examine “the Chicago way” from many different angles in order to interrogate the values with which various artists have endowed the city. We will read in a broad range of media: journalism, poetry, song, fiction, film, and sequential art to see how a sense of Chicago as a place has both changed and remained consistent over time. We will pay close attention to depictions of the construction of American identity, and to the role of the artist and intellectual in the city. The class will include, but not require, a bicycle tour.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 12:30 – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40264
ENGLISH 386-0 Studies in Literature & Film: American Detective Stories

In this course, students will explore the “place” of American detective fiction and film. First, they will examine the methods by which mystery writers and filmmakers bring geography to life, and contemplate what it means to set a crime narrative in a metropolis rather than a village, or on the West Coast rather than in the Midwest. To what extent do fictional investigators attempt to solve not only mysterious crimes, but also problematic places? Second, students will chart the cultural and political “geography” of the detective genre: In what material “spaces” are they printed or screened? What “place” do they occupy in the social hierarchy of taste? In addition to analyzing an array of classic and contemporary mystery texts, students will discuss and evaluate theories of genre, narrative form, region, and human geography.

Stories by Edgar Allan Poe; Pudd’nhead Wilson by Mark Twain; The Long Goodbye by Raymond Chandler; Lush Life by Richard Price; Rear Window, dir. Alfred Hitchcock; The Long Goodbye, dir. Robert Altman; Chinatown, dir. Roman Polanski; Lone Star, dir. John Sayles; episodes of The Wire and True Detective.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/25/14 - 08/13/14 W 6:15 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Finance
FINANCE 202-CN Introduction to Finance

An introductory course covering the basic concepts and models used in finance, this Introduction to Finance course explores the mathematics and spreadsheet modeling techniques used in evaluating various financial assets, including stocks and bonds. It also surveys the risk-return tradeoff in financial markets and how investors gauge risk, in addition to the basic concepts of Markowitz's mean-variance portfolio theory. The nature and impact of interest-rate risk on financial institutions is considered, and the duration of a financial asset is introduced in this context. Introduces the efficient market hypothesis and its implications for personal investing and corporate finance. Please note: This course is makes use of blended learning, which requires students to engage in online discussions, activities and projects throughout the week. Students must have access to high speed Internet to enroll. Prerequisite: MATH 101, STAT 202, or College Algebra, Statistics, Financial Accounting, Microeconomics, and Macroeconomics, or equivalents. Carries business credit. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/28/14 M 6 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41044
FINANCE 360-CN Corporate Finance

This course will cover capital budgeting, or how corporate managers determine where to invest a company's funds; how companies determine what an appropriate discount rate would be for a given capital investment; the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) and the Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT) models used to estimate a firm's cost of equity, along with a detailed consideration of how beta is estimated for the CAPM; how a company derives its weighted average cost of capital (WACC); the dividend policy decision; and capital structure theory. Financial planning models will also be considered in depth. This course will also cover the adjustments typically made to financial statement data to accommodate the needs and viewpoints of financial analysts and investors. Finally, this course will introduce the topic of corporate risk management (hedging techniques). Prerequisite: FINANCE 202 or equivalent. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/11/14 M 6 – 9:15 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40974
French
FRENCH 111-1 First-Year French

This course is for students who wish to complete all or part of the first year of college French. Any one of the three courses may be taken separately. The three-course sequence aims to build skills in speaking, understanding, writing, and reading French through study, practice, and class activities. Classes include a variety of activities designed to help students acquire knowledge of basic French vocabulary and structures along with the ability to use what they have learned in situations of communication. Classes are conducted in French except when explanation of grammar or other material may necessitate the use of English.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40012
FRENCH 111-2 First-Year French

See FRENCH 111-1 for course description. Prerequisite: FRENCH 111-1.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40013
FRENCH 111-3 First-Year French

See FRENCH 111-1 for course description. Prerequisite: FRENCH 111-2.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40014
FRENCH 121-1 Second-Year French

For students who wish to complete all or part of the second year of college French. Any one of the three courses in this sequence may be taken separately. Using Le Français Internautique, an interactive online program, students review and practice basic grammar and improve their listening comprehension while exploring contemporary French culture. This first course in the sequence stresses oral communication and requires a minimum of two hours of work per day outside of class in the Multimedia Learning Center computer lab or on a computer with high-speed Internet access and a current browser. Classes are conducted in French. Prerequisite: first-year college French or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 1 – 4 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40089
FRENCH 121-2 Second-Year French

This second course in the sequence develops writing skills and requires a minimum of two hours of work per day outside of class in the Multimedia Learning Center computer lab or on a computer with high-speed Internet access and a current browser. Classes are conducted in French. Prerequisite: FRENCH 121-1 or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 1 – 4 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40090
FRENCH 121-3 Second-Year French

This third course in the sequence focuses on reading (short stories and excerpts from literary texts) and requires a minimum of two hours of work per day outside of class in the Multimedia Learning Center computer lab or on a computer with high-speed Internet access and a current browser. Classes are conducted in French. Prerequisite: FRENCH 121-2 or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF 1 – 4 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40091
FRENCH 379-0 Advanced Topics in French Culture and Literature

Which is the real Paris? A city of bohemians and intellectuals? Or workers and revolutionaries? Avant-garde artists, Nazi collaborators, protesting students or immigrants? This course, taught in English, will explore representations of Paris in the 19th and 20th Centuries, drawing from the diverse, shifting and sometimes contradictory perspectives on the city and its inhabitants. Students will read and analyze authors including Honoré de Balzac, Arthur Rimbaud, Charles Baudelaire, Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, André Breton, Guy Debord and Alain Mabanckou, as well as theories of urbanization, globalization, and modernity. Students will also pursue projects on the visual and discursive representations of Paris in film, popular culture, and the visual arts. Finally, we will take advantage of the resources available in the city of Chicago, potentially including explorations of Paris-influenced architecture and a visit to the Art Institute.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Communication
GEN_CMN 101-0 Interpersonal Communication

Through lecture, discussion and exercises, this course introduces students to key concepts in the study of interpersonal communication. The course is designed to: increase students' awareness and understanding of communication processes; encourage students to think critical about communication theory and practice; provide background for upper-level communication courses. No prerequisites.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40879
GEN_CMN 102-0 Public Speaking

This course involves the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism of public speeches. Students learn effective public presentation strategies, to be implemented in four to five class assignments ranging from impromptu speaking to persuasion and argumentation. Students develop critical listening skills by evaluating their own public speaking style as well as the effectiveness of their peers and famous public speakers. The course objective is to build confidence in public speaking in a laboratory setting, to learn the power of public rhetoric in a social and professional forum, and to provide practical experience for those desiring to become better speakers in a variety of public communication environments.

Summer 2014 Sec #102-0
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40848
GEN_CMN 102-0 Public Speaking

This course involves the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism of public speeches. Students learn effective public presentation strategies, to be implemented in four to five class assignments ranging from impromptu speaking to persuasion and argumentation. Students develop critical listening skills by evaluating their own public speaking style as well as the effectiveness of their peers and famous public speakers. The course objective is to build confidence in public speaking in a laboratory setting, to learn the power of public rhetoric in a social and professional forum, and to provide practical experience for those desiring to become better speakers in a variety of public communication environments.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/13/14 MW 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40842
Music: Courses for Nonmajors
GEN_MUS 170-0 Introduction to Music

This course will help students to become informed listeners and critical thinkers with respect to a broad range of musical styles and genres. Students will learn how to approach musical sound and structure, position music within its cultural contexts, and consider a variety of musical practices, aesthetics, and ideologies. Particular goals of the course are to build strong listening skills and to acquire the vocabulary to write about and discuss music effectively. No previous musical experience is required.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 10 – 11:40 a.m. MAB 037
Evanston Campus Open
GEN_MUS 175-0 Selected Topics for Non-Majors: American Musical Theater

This course will explore one of the quintessentially American forms of performance- the Broadway musical. Topics to be considered include the relationship of the genre to American culture and society, the genre as a commercial medium, its principal creators and performers, and its role in the formation of America's national identity, highlighting contemporary perspectives on racial and sexual prejudices, myths and stereotypes. The musicals discussed in class will include Show Boat, Oklahoma!, West Side Story, Company and Rent among others. There are no class prerequisites.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 10 – 11:50 a.m. MAB 43
Evanston Campus Open
GEN_MUS 175-0 Selected Topics: Recording Techniques

This class will look in detail at microphone design and placement techniques, covering stereo miking, close and distant miking of instruments and ensembles, and "source" recording for sound design applications. Students learn how to choose the right microphone for the instrument or voice and how details of mic placement affect the sound quality, often dramatically. The course also covers hardware and effects processing associated with the production process. The material is supplemented by in-class recording and miking demonstrations. Projects consist of students making their own recordings using the techniques covered in class. Music background welcome but not required.

Summer 2014 Sec #21
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 10 – 11:50 a.m. MAB 109
Evanston Campus Open
GEN_MUS 175-0 The Beatles and the Rolling Stones

Beatles or Stones? The debate rages on even today. This course will examine what these great rock and roll bands have in common and how they differ: melodies, chord progressions, instrumentation, lyrics, styles of singing and playing, live performances, production and fashion. We will also discuss A Hard Day’s Night and Gimme Shelter, the high points of these bands’ legacies on film. The course focuses on the decade from 1962-1972 but will also touch on influences such as Chuck Berry and the best of the post-Exile Stones. Assignments will include short papers and in-class presentations. No prior musical knowledge or training is required for this class.

Summer 2014 Sec #22
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh noon – 2:30 p.m. MAB 043
Evanston Campus Open
GEN_MUS 252-0 Harmony

The primary goal of this class is to gain fluency in the vocabulary and elements of common-practice tonal music: its notation, construction, and modes of analysis. While emphasis will be placed on harmonic structure and function, through analysis exercises and ear training, we will also discuss other factors that contribute to our enjoyment and understanding of music, such as rhythm, meter, and melodic construction. Reading fluency in treble and/or bass clef will be assumed as a prerequisite for this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuWF noon – 1:50 p.m. MAB 114
Evanston Campus Open
German
GERMAN 101-1 Beginning German

This is the first course in a three-course foundation sequence in elementary German. The sequence uses a communicative approach to provide students with all four language skills -- speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing -- to ensure that students acquire a basic command of German. Classes are conducted largely in German, except when explanation of grammar or other material may require the use of English. This is an intensive approach, requiring a minimum of two hours of homework preparation per class, but the small class size affords summer students many opportunities to practice their German. Students completing the sequence should be well prepared for any intermediate-level German program. Students may enroll in individual courses (subject to skill level) or the entire sequence.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40015
GERMAN 101-2 Beginning German

See GERMAN 101-1 for course description.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40016
GERMAN 101-3 Beginning German

See GERMAN 101-1 for course description.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40017
GERMAN 105-0 German for Reading and Research

Goals of German for Research:
This course is designed for students who wish to acquire competent reading skills in the German Language. Pre-requisite: 1-year of college level German/102-1.

Teaching Methodology:
We will begin with the study of elementary forms and constructions, reinforced and solidified with exercises and reading assignments taken from various fields including the arts, philosophy, history, and current events. The readings will serve to exercise basic vocabulary; frequent exposure and repetition facilitates the process of acquiring an elementary repertoire of words and phrases.
Special texts taken from the different fields of the participants will then be introduced. Students will be asked to prepare translations of these texts at home; they will use a dictionary and time themselves.

Evaluation:
Evaluation of students' performance will be based on oral translation in class and on individual work with translation texts. Additional assignments are periodic vocabulary quizzes, a mid-term practice examination, and a final project consisting of the translation of an article or chapter of a book in the participant's field. However, this is a non-graded course and evaluations are used solely to indicate individual progress.

 

 

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 9 – 11:30 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41875
Gender Studies
GNDR_ST 321-0 LGBTQ Legal Activism

This course introduces students to the history of LGBTQ legal activism. Beginning in the 1970s, we will focus on debates between lesbian and gay (and later bisexual, transgender, and queer) activists over how and when to usethe law and courts. We will use these debates as a lens onto the very different ways that activists defined the meaning of LGBTQ identity and the goals of a lesbian and gay social movement. We will consider the strategic, political, cultural, and ideological stakes involved in these debates. We will also consider how these debates have and have not taken up the intersection of LGBTQ identities with issues of race, gender, poverty, age discrimination, and immigration status. Topics to be covered include: the emergence of lesbian and gay legal organizations in the 1970s; feminism and the relationship of lesbian rights to gay rights; the emergence of HIV in the 1980s and debates over how much attention should be paid to HIV; the relationship of sodomy laws to other lesbian and gay legal goals; strategic and ideological debates over whether and how activists should pursue same-sex marriage; and ongoing debates over how to include transgender rights. Throughout the course, we will use this history to consider the complicated relationship between law, politics, culture, and LGBTQ social movements.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 12:30 – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41876
GNDR_ST 382-0 Gender, Sexuality & Race: Queer of Color Performance

This course explores the strategies by which queers of color (QoC) use performance toward social, cultural, and political ends, and asks how these performances translate in every day life. By reading works from scholars working on QoC criticism, we will familiarize ourselves with the various aesthetic modes through which QoC artists critique and re-tool dominant frames of identity and representation. These modes include appropriation, disidentification, testimony, and camping. They are not mutually exclusive, nor are they confined to QoCs; as such, we will raise questions about the ethics and efficacy of these performance practices. How do QoCs employ these performance modes to make evident and palpable hegemonies of gender, race, nation, and class? The class will provide language with which to analyze and discuss performance as it relates to gender, sexuality, and race. Students will be introduced to and critically analyze a wide range of artists such as D’Lo, Arthur Aviles, Lenelle Moise, Tarell Alvin McRaney, Vaginal Davis, Stacey Ann Chin, and Margaret Cho. While most of these artists are located in North America, many of them have grown up, lived, or performed elsewhere. As such, the content of their performances asks us to engage with concepts of diaspora, migration, and transnationalism within QoC critique.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
GNDR_ST 390-0 Gender in Pop Music Performance

This course considers how popular music in the U. S. and internationally can reinvigorate and resist notions of gender, sexuality, race, and nation. Special emphasis will be given to lived experiences and identities at the borderlands of these categories: Transgender, queer, mixed race, and transnational belonging. We explore how music performers and their listening audiences navigate norms around sex, gender, and sexuality in music by asking how these categories are imbricated with other vectors of power including race, ethnicity, religion, dis/ability, class, and nation. Music styles may include blues, jazz, folk, corridos, country, bhangra, disco, punk, rock, sissy bounce, salsa and hip-hop. The course draws from written texts spanning gender theory, performance studies, ethno/musicology, auto/biography, aural texts from music recordings to live performances, and visual texts, including video, film, and live performance. Our goal in engaging with popular music in these varied forms will be to develop critical lines of questioning (rather than producing neat answers) along several divergent but related tracks, including 1. how music can/does reinvigorate and resist social norms; how practitioners use music as a mode of self-fashioning; and 3. how marginalized communities (have) use(d) music as a strategy of resistance. No prior experience in music studies is required, but at least one previous course in gender studies is strongly recommended.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Cancelled Caesar ID: 41877
History
HISTORY 201-1 European Civilization: High Medieval thru mid-18th C

This course surveys the development and rise of pre-industrial European civilization, and examines Europe’s culture, politics, religion, social life, and relations with neighboring societies. The course will take students from the first Crusade at the end of the 11th century through the Age of Absolutism and the enlightened monarchies of the mid-18th century, and will focus on the changing self-perception of the West over this period. Key topics will include Agricultural Revolution, High Middle Ages, Renaissance, Commercial Revolution, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment.

Reading List:

The West: Encounters and Transformations, combined volume, 4th edition, edited by Brian Levack, Edward Muir, and Meredith Veldman (Pearson, 2013).

This course counts toward the Weinberg College historical studies distribution requirement, Area IV.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2 – 4:20 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40199
HISTORY 201-2 European Civilization: Mid 18th Century to Present

This course surveys the major events in European history from the Industrial Revolution to the establishment of the European Union. We will explore the effects of social, political, and industrial change on European society and attempt to answer the question—how did Europeans become modern? Topics covered include the industrial, French, and Russian Revolutions, nationalism and the rise of European empires, the world wars and their aftermaths, and uniting a divided postwar Europe. We will also think the ways in which new political and social thought, theories about race, changing ideas about gender roles and the organization of the family, and scientific and technological innovations shaped how states were organized, governments worked, and ordinary people lived their lives.


Reading List:

Making of the West Peoples and Cultures: Since 1500, Lynn Hunt et al. ISBN-13: 978-0312554606

The Marriage of Figaro, Pierre de Beaumarchais ISBN-13: 978-0140441338

The Communist Manifesto, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels ISBN-13: 978-0140447576 [Or online]

Passage to India, E. M. Forster ISBN-13: 978-0156711425

Civilization and Its Discontents, Sigmund Freud ISBN-13: 978-0393304510

Goodbye to All That, Robert Graves ISBN-13: 978-0385093309

The Drowned and the Saved, Primo Levi ISBN-13: 978-0679721864



Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/25/14 - 08/13/14 W 3 – 6:20 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40285
HISTORY 210-1 History of the United States, Pre-Colonial to the Civil War

This course will explore major events in American history from the first encounters between Natives, Europeans, and Africans though the Civil War, using evolving understandings of freedom as an interpretive framework. For many people, early America was a testing ground, marketplace, and battlefield for differing interpretations of liberty. In this course, we will trace the experiences of men and women, sailors and farmers, planters and slaves, Indians and colonists, and how this diverse group of people struggled to decide the meaning and extent of freedom. Was it universal? Bounded by ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation? Where did freedom come from? Did government threaten or protect freedom? We will read primary sources to seek out the voices of both famous and ordinary people as they grappled with these and other questions, and how both their answers and questions changed over time. Ideas about freedom shaped --and were shaped by --transatlantic migrations, religious revivals, wars of empire and independence, political upheavals, and global economic transformations. While exploring these ideas, this course will help students develop their historical thinking and writing abilities.

READING LIST: Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty! (4th ed., available in paperback, volume 1)
Eric Foner, Voices of Freedom, a Documentary History, volume 1.

Gordon Wood, The Radicalism of the American Revolution

Gary Nash, The Unknown American Revolution: The Unruly Birth of Democracy and the Struggle to Create America

Paul E. Johnson, A Shopkeeper’s Millennium: Society and Revivals in Rochester, New York, 1815-1837

Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Dover Thrift Edition)
Course Packet

 

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2 – 4:20 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41895
HISTORY 210-2 History of the United States: Reconstruction to the Present

This course covers major themes in United States history with an emphasis on political, cultural and social movements since 1865. Lectures and discussions will focus on racial tensions stemming from slavery, urbanization, westward and global expansion, immigration, the rise of the welfare state, and America as it emerged as a world power and an economic hegemon. Using race and gender as categories of analysis, students will learn to critically engage with primary

sources in order to question which groups have been included and which have been categorically excluded from the legal and cultural boundaries of American citizenship. Ultimately, students will leave the class with the tools necessary to make broader connections between the issues

READING LIST:

Henretta, James, Rebecca Edwards and Robert Self. America: A Concise History: Volume Two: Since 1865 (Paperback) ISBN 978-0312643294.

Henretta, James and Kevin Fernlund. Documents For America's History: Vol II: Since 1865, (Paperback) ISBN 978-0312648633.

Readings to be Posted on Blackboard

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2 – 4:20 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41896
HISTORY 212-2 Introduction to African American History, Emancipation to the Civil Rights Era

This course is a survey of African American history from Emancipation to the modern civil rights era. The course is designed to highlight continuities of resistance to racial oppression from the onset of freedom in the 1860s through the emergence of a second reconstruction in the 1960s. Rather than narrating a linear story of gradually improving race relations, this course reveals that the long Black freedom struggle experienced elusive moments of racial progress amid sustained periods of setback. We will examine how competing visions of freedom led to violence and unrest throughout the period covered, from local struggles to maintain white supremacy following emancipation, through the rise of disenfranchisement and Jim Crow, to the race riots of the early twentieth-century, and up through the official repression of organized Black militants in the 1920s and 1930s. We will explore various competing resistance strategies advocated by a range of Black leaders, including Booker T. Washington’s pragmatic embrace of accommodationism, W.E.B. Du Bois’s assertive call for organized protest, Marcus Garvey’s inspiring enunciation of race pride, and the Popular Front’s expansive vision of political possibilities during the depths of the Great Depression. Concluding with the ambivalent impact of the Cold War on the long freedom struggle, this course ends just as a new generation of African American activists and ordinary people stood poised to face the great challenges of the modern civil rights movement of the 1960s.

 

Readings will be made available on Blackboard.

 

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2 – 4:20 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41897
HISTORY 301-1SA New Lectures in History: City and Civilization in the Eastern Mediterranean World

This course is taught in Istanbul; for more information, please call the Center for International and Comparative Studies at 847-467-1152. HIST 301-1 New Lectures in History: City and Civilization in the Eastern Mediterranean World. This course highlights the socioeconomic, political, cultural, and physical continuities and changes of Istanbul from Byzantine times to the present, emphasizing the themes of space, state power, and economic structures. After tracing the transformation of the Byzantine imperial center into an Ottoman capital city and the development of Ottoman imperial culture, the class focuses on the political and socioeconomic relations between the Ottoman state and the diverse communities of the capital city. The challenge of modernizing Istanbul during the late Ottoman and Republic periods is likewise examined. The course ends with discussion of the socioeconomic and cultural impact of globalization on the sprawling metropolis. Never colonized yet clearly under the increasing influence of the West, Ottoman Istanbul provides a fascinating locus for understanding the interchange between Islamic and Christian European societies. Modern Turkish society and culture are examined as they reflect the syntheses and tensions between traditional Ottoman Islamic and Western institutions and cultural traditions. Late Roman, Byzantine, Ottoman, and Turkish Republican art and architecture are viewed throughout the course.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/29/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40242
HISTORY 301-2SA New Lectures in History: Milestones of Czech History and Civilization

This course is taught in Prague; for more information, please call the Study Abroad Office at 847.467.6400

This course provides an introduction to cultural aspects of the Czech and central European environment in a broader sense. It concentrates on major historical events and processes that have shaped developments in the area and contributed to Czech national identity. Cultural awareness is acquired through readings and lectures and developed through discussions. Visits to historically important sites in Prague and the Czech Republic are an integral part of the course. Participants are expected to gain background knowledge of the region's history and civilization and to understand and examine the effects of social changes on the social fabric of the nation. The course is complemented with reading and analysis of important fiction from the relevant time periods.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/29/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40266
HISTORY 315-2 The United States Since 1900: Mid-20th Century, 1929-1969

Americans witnessed dramatic changes in the middle decades of the twentieth century. This course examines the United States during shifts from depression to prosperity, from World War II to a global cold war, and from protests for racial equality to the radical activism that emerged in the late 1960s. It emphasizes the pursuit of "consensus," especially the rise and fall of the New Deal coalition, and explores how the changes between 1929 and 1969 reinforced or challenged the consensus that Americans fought so desperately to preserve.

READING LIST
Adam Rome, The Bulldozer in the Countryside
Wendy L. Wall, Inventing the "American Way"
Rosa Parks, My Story
Articles, Book chapters, and primary documents available via Blackboard

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/13/14 MW 6 – 7:50 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41898
HISTORY 325-0 History of American Technology

Whether we like it or not, we 21st century inhabitants of America are surrounded at all times by technological objects and technological systems. We use electric lights, enjoy the comforts of indoor plumbing, and retrieve information through the Internet often within 30 minutes of waking up in the morning! How did American life come to be so saturated with technology? We will attempt to answer that question in this class, along with other important questions regarding technology. In particular, we will investigate the ways in which individuals and groups have used technology throughout American history to modify the environment in which large amounts of people lived. Such modification was frequently thought of as political as well as technological in nature. Students should expect a brisk reading schedule and blue book exams.


READING LIST:
1) Nye, David E. America as Second Creation: Technology and Narratives of New Beginnings. Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press, 2003. ISBN: 0262640597
2) Nye, David E. Narratives and Spaces: Technology and the Construction of American Culture. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997. ISBN: 0231111975
3) Smith, Merritt Roe, and Gregory Clancey, editors. Major Problems in the History of American Technology. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998. ISBN: 0669354724

 

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh noon – 2:20 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41899
HISTORY 368-2 Revolution in 20th Century Latin America: Marxist Revolutions

This course introduces students to the history of 20th-century Latin America through the investigation of the most prominent cases of revolutions and counter-revolutions that took place in the region. The study of pivotal processes such as the Mexican and the Cuban revolutions, the military regimes established in South America during the Cold War, and the late-20th-century civil wars in Central America will shed light on a number of key themes: the role of leaders, social groups and the masses in socio-economic and political transformations; the interplay between ideas, culture, interests and opportunities in the dynamics of politics; the constant interaction of national, regional and international factors; the long-lasting effects of political violence, military intervention and dictatorship on societies; the problematic definition of “revolution” and “counter-revolution” as analytic concepts.

TENTATIVE READING LIST
Joseph, Gilbert M., and Timothy J. Henderson, eds. The Mexico Reader: History, Culture, Politics. Durham: Duke University Press, 2003.
Pe´rez, Louis A., Cuba: Between Reform and Revolution. 4th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
Pereira, Anthony W. Political (In)justice : Authoritarianism and the Rule of Law in Brazil, Chile, and Argentina. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2005.
LaFeber, Walter. Inevitable Revolutions: the United States in Central America. 2nd ed. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1993.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 9:30 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41900
HISTORY 392-0 Topics in History - History of Political Islam, 1882-Present

This class provides an introduction to the history of political Islam from the careers of nineteenth-century Islamic reformists Jamal al-Afghani, Muhammad Abduh, and Rashid Rida through the “globalized Islam” depicted by scholar Olivier Roy. It concludes with new directions in Islamist thought and practice. The course attends to both Sunni and Shi‘i strands of political Islam across the Middle East, with particular attention given to the history of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood, and to the ascendance of a revised interpretation of Shi‘i political thought following the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran. Organizing questions for the course include: How did the meaning of an Islamic state change through the twentieth century? Why did the state’s relation to political Islam in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Iran change in the ways it did over the period?

 

READING LIST
Patricia Crone, God's Rule: Government and Islam
Olivier Roy, Globalized Islam: The Search for a new Ummah
Giiles Kepel, Jihad: The Trail of Political Islam
James Toth, Sayyid Qutb: The Life and Legacy of a Radical Islamic Intellectual
Asef Bayat, Post-Islamism: The Changing Face of Political Islam
Albert Hourani, Arabic Thought in the Liberal Age, 1798-1939
James L. Gelvin, The Modern Middle East: A History
Said Amir Arjomand, The Turban for the Crown: The Islamic Revolution in Iran

 

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 1 – 3:20 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41911
International Studies
INTL_ST 390-0 Small Wars in the Twentieth Century: Counter Insurgency as a Major Theme in Recent Wars


This is a class on warfare in the 20th century, or more specifically, 'small wars' in the 20th century. In this class 'small' refers more to localized than to short or unintense. These wars may be anti-colonial {such as Mau Mau (Kenya), Vietnam, Algeria or Malaysia}, they may be ideological (Malaysia, Vietnam), or Civil (Somalia, Bosnia, Rwanda). In this class we will chose one from each of these categories and explore the context, military aspects, peace making operations, external supporters, international agencies such as the U.N.. We will also examine several variables such as religion, ethnicity, geography etc. in order to map out what factors count as determinant and which are more dependent. Readings will include articles on counter-insurgency as a mode of operations in such wars, the nature of war since the cold war, the move from rural to urban warfare in the 21st century, and material specifically on the wars of choice for the class. Written work will consist of three short papers.

 

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6 – 8:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41878
INTL_ST 393-SA Development in the Global Context: Participation, Power, and Social Change

This course combines classroom learning as well as field experience and in-country research to examine international development in the “global South” with an emphasis on participatory, community-based development approaches. The course sets contemporary development practice in the context of fundamental debates over the nature and goals of international development, the causes of global poverty and the history of development, with particular attention to the relationships between participation, power and social change. Additionally, students are also introduced to specific social, political and economic context of the countries they will be working in and how those factors influence development outcomes. Students take this course as part of the Global Engagement Studies Institute summer study abroad program and use their experience from the field to critically assess development theory and practice.

Enrollment is by application only. Applications accepted until March 1st, 2014. Please visit www.gesi.northwestern.edu to learn more and apply. NOTE CLASS DATES: 6/16/14-6/22/14 AND 8/17/14-8/19/14.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/16/14 - 08/19/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open
Italian
ITALIAN 101-1 Elementary Italian

This three-course sequence in elementary Italian covers a full year of the language. At the end of the sequence, students are able to ask and answer simple questions in Italian, write a grammatically correct sentence, and follow the drift of a simple conversation. The emphasis is on person-to-person communication. Students build grammar skills by working on simple situations - greetings, introductions, asking directions - that grow in complexity as the course proceeds. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and include a wide range of exercises, small-group projects, video, and Internet sites. Students also gain knowledge of fundamental aspects of Italian culture, history, and geography. Weinberg students with some experience in Italian may take an exam to place out of any or all of the first-year sequence. Courses may be taken individually (subject to prerequisites) or in sequence.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40174
ITALIAN 101-2 Elementary Italian

See ITALIAN 101-1 for course description. Prerequisite: ITALIAN 101-1.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40175
ITALIAN 101-3 Elementary Italian

See ITALIAN 101-1 for course description. Prerequisite: ITALIAN 101-2.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40176
Japanese
JAPANESE 111-1 Japanese l

JAPANESE 111-1 is the first quarter of Japanese I (JAPANESE 111-1, 2 and 3), a yearlong course that covers the first half of the elementary Japanese. JAPANESE 111-1 covers speaking, aural comprehension and reading and writing, and introduces the Hiragana and Katakana syllabaries and Kanji characters. Upon the satisfactory completion of this course, students will be able to greet, introduce themselves, discuss their daily routines, and write short letters to teachers and friends. In order to continue to JAPANESE 111-2, which is offered in Winter Quarter, students must pass JAPANESE 111-1 with a grade of C- or above.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 10 – 11:50 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40289
Music: Jazz Studies
JAZZ_ST 440-0 Seminar in Jazz Pedagogy

A student driven course of study emphasizing teaching jazz in the public school. Jazz theory and harmony, improvisation, basic arranging skills, rehearsal techniques for large and small jazz ensembles will be discussed, in addition to issues driven by student input. Prior experience in jazz education is not required, only an interest and commitment to jazz in our schools.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 8 – 10 a.m. MAB 229
Evanston Campus Open
Journalism
Journalism courses are open to all students; however, Northwestern day school students must obtain their dean's approval to enroll in these courses. Journalism laboratory courses JRN WRIT 201-A and JRN WRIT 380 may not be audited.
JRN_WRIT 201-A Journalistic Writing Practice I

The business of journalism is under siege these days-but the skills acquired in journalism courses are as useful as ever. This course, taught by an award-winning teacher at the world famous Medill School of Journalism, provides the framework for clear communication. It emphasizes conciseness in expressing thoughts and facts. Through readings, discussion and numerous writing exercises the student gains confidence and demonstrates marked improvement in written expression, week by week. Specifically, this course intends to: Sharpen word selection and usage; clear up problems with grammar and writing style; clean up sentence structure; make writing appealing for the intended audience and increase writing speed. Whether you intend to write for publication or to write more effectively in the workplace, this course gives you the foundational skills to achieve your communication goals. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #25
06/23/14 - 07/21/14 M 6 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41030
Latina and Latino Studies
LATINO 392-0 Race and the Hip-Hop Generation

Despite the popular perception that the Civil Rights Movement healed America’s racial wounds and that the end of the Cold War signaled the triumph of democracy and egalitarianism, communities of color have been wrought with epic rates of unemployment, poor access to education, poor access to housing, poor access to health care, police brutality, incarceration, drug and alcohol addiction, juvenile pregnancy, the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and gang violence since the 1980s. This course will investigate the historical and contemporary circumstances that allowed for this contradiction. Special attention will be given to the unique expressive genres and activist movements that have been born in response to the aforementioned conditions. Hip-Hop Culture is one among other focal points in the course, as it is examined within the context of the structural/political context from which it emerged and which it reflects. This is a course about an era, the challenges that define it, and the subjectivities it has spawned.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
Linguistics
LING 260-0 Formal Analysis of Words and Sentences

This course introduces grammatical principles that govern the structure of sentences (syntax) in human languages around the world. The aim of the course is to strengthen your skills in analytic reasoning and scientific theory construction through the study of syntactic patterns. LING 260 satisfies the WCAS Area II (Formal Studies) Distribution Requirement.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 2:30 – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40229
LING 270-0 Meaning

People use languages like English to convey information. What makes a language, superficially no more than a bunch of noises or strings, suitable for this purpose, and how does it work? This question is at the center of the study of language meaning. In this course we will consider questions like these: How do the meanings of words like “everyone,” “a,” “hit,” and “saw,” give rise to the similarities and differences between “Everyone saw a hit,” “Everyone hit a saw,” “A saw hit everyone,” etc.? Can we always tell for sure what a given sentence means, and does it mean the same on all occasions? Is meaning something that a language has or something people do with it? What's the place of meaning in the overall theory of language? We will explore a variety of approaches to these questions and discuss their theoretical premises, methodological tools, and empirical strengths and weaknesses.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2:30 – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41888
Mathematics
MATH 220-0 Differential Calculus of One-Variable Functions

Elements of differential and integral calculus. Definition of a function; trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions; graphs, limits, continuity, derivative of a function, product, quotient and chain rule, implicit differentiation, linear approximation and differentials, related rates, mean value theorems, curve plotting, optimization problems, Newton's method, and antiderivatives. Taken consecutively, 220 and 224 are equivalent to two-thirds of a year in calculus. Prerequisite: three years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #24
06/23/14 - 07/17/14 MTuWTh 1 – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40038
MATH 224-0 Integral Calculus of One-Variable Functions

Elements of differential and integral calculus. Integral calculus in one variable. Definite integrals and the fundamental theorems of calculus. Techniques of integration, including integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitutions, partial fractions, numerical integration, and improper integrals. Applications of integration; computation of volumes, arc length, average value of functions. The mean value theorem for integration, work, and probability. Sequences and series; the integral and comparison tests, power series, ratio test, introduction to Taylor's formula, Taylor series, and using the series to solve differential equations. Taken consecutively, MATH 220 and 224 are equivalent to two-thirds of an academic year in calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 220 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #24
07/21/14 - 08/14/14 MTuWTh 1 – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40039
MATH 230-0 Differential Calculus of Multivariable Functions

Vectors, dot and cross products, equations of lines and planes; polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; differentiation of vector functions; velocity and acceleration, arc length, parametric surfaces, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, tangent plane and linear approximations, chain rule for partial derivatives, directional derivative and gradient, max-min problems for functions of several variables, Lagrange multipliers. Prerequisite: MATH 224-0 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/13/14 MW 3 – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40083
MATH 234-0 Multiple Integration and Vector Calculus

Cylindrical and spherical coordinates, double and triple integrals, line and surface integrals. Change of variables in multiple integrals; gradient, divergence, and curl. Theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. Prerequisite: 230. Students may not receive credit for both 234 and 281-1, 285-3, 290-3, or 291-3. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 3 – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40184
MATH 240-0 Linear Algebra

Basic concepts of linear algebra. Solutions of systems of linear equations; vectors and matrices; subspaces, linear independence, and bases; determinants; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; other topics and applications as time permits. Math 230-0 or its equivalent is prerequisite for Math 240-0. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/13/14 MW 10 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40150
MATH 300-0 Foundations of Higher Mathematics

Introduction to fundamental mathematical ideas such as sets, functions, equivalence relations, and cardinal numbers and to basic techniques of writing proofs. Prerequisite: MATH 240. This course may not be taken for credit after MATH 320-1, 321-1, 330-1, or 331-1 without prior departmental consent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 10 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40092
MATH 334-0 Linear Algebra II: Second Course

Abstract theory of vector spaces and linear transformations. Complex vector spaces, unitary and Hermitian matrices. Jordan canonical form. Selected applications as time permits. Students who took 330-1 (formerly 337-1) prior to 2004-05 may not also take 334 for credit toward the major without departmental consent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 7 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40198
Marketing
MKTG 201-CN Marketing I: Principles of Marketing

Marketing structure and processes whereby products proceed from the place of production to final use or consumption. Sales management, retailing, foreign trade, advertising, channels of distribution for marketing different types of products, activities of wholesale and retail middlemen and other important marketing institutions, cooperative marketing, market risk, sources of marketing information, price determination, governmental activity related to marketing, cost of marketing, and general critique of market structure. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 07/24/14 TuTh 6 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40975
MKTG 390-CN Topics in Marketing: New Media and Technology

Internet marketing has become a critical component of a marketer's overall strategy. This course focuses on necessary Internet marketing tactics and strategies, enabling marketers to fully leverage the Internet and its various channels in their overall marketing mix. Topics to be covered include the overall Internet advertising landscape, technologies and channels employed, targeting, measurement, and privacy concerns. Additionally, students learn about customer centric marketing, and how new and emerging advertising platforms and technology, including podcasts, blogging, RSS, viral marketing, social networking, online video, virtual worlds, mobile advertising, IP-based television, and rich Internet applications, are being leveraged by marketers today. Students will also develop a comprehensive marketing plan incorporating topics discussed throughout this course. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. For the online component, students must have ready access to the Internet. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/28/14 - 07/26/14 Sa 9 a.m. – noon
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41048
MKTG 390-CN Topics in Marketing: Integrated Marketing Communications

This course examines the importance of coordinating all promotional elements to develop an effective communications program and integrates theory with planning, management, and strategy. Business/marketing approaches are combined with journalistic/communications models. Public relations and advertising, with emphasis on sales promotion, direct marketing, personal selling, and publicity are covered.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/25/14 M 6 – 9:15 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41124
MKTG 390-CN Topics in Marketing: Sales Management

Professional sales management integrates sales and marketing management while illustrating how the entire sales and marketing organization must function as a team while working with customers to solve problems of mutual interest. Focus is placed on the aspects that are critical to developing, executing, and managing a powerful, long-lasting sales strategy. Emphasis is placed on relationship selling, which seeks to establish long-term partnerships with customers based on trust, quality, service and mutual respect. Students will be exposed to the pragmatic view of field sales people regarding time management and strategic issues involved in personal selling.

Summer 2014 Sec #30
06/26/14 - 08/14/14 Th 6 – 9:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41857
Education: Master of Science in Education
For information about the Master of Science in Education program and admission procedures, please contact the School of Education and Social Policy at 847/467-1458.
MS_ED 402-0 Social Contexts of Education

The course examines how social contexts such as families, schools and the workplace shape individuals; as well as how individuals' intellectual and interpersonal capacities, preferences, and goals are shaped by their social contexts. This course also examines the societal structures that organize, supply, and channel individual learning experiences and how they provide the formal and informal settings in which social interaction takes place. Students will also explore how participation in these socializing settings molds the development of individuals' capacities and forms their goals. NOTE: Open to professional educators.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/25/14 - 07/30/14 W 6 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41363
MS_ED 408-0 Research and Analysis in Teaching and Learning III: Analysis Interpretation and Dissemination

The course helps students refine the reflective skills required of educators in complex social institutions such as schools, businesses, and nonprofit organizations and develop effective problem-identification and -solving approaches. Intensive analysis and discussion of questions encountered in elementary and secondary schools, administrative, higher education, and corporate settings. Students present their Master's Project in this course. Note: For MS Ed Graduate Students Only

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/29/14 Tu 6 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41364
MS_ED 422-0 Teaching Reading in the Content Area

The course is designed to help middle school and high school teachers who teach subjects other than English develop an understanding of specific strategies that readers must use to achieve deep comprehension of content material. Students will explore cognitive foundations of reading comprehension and their influence on methods of instruction and assessment, as well as the interrelationships among reading processes and language learning. Theory and practice relationships will be explored as students experience and learn about: text structure, use of background knowledge, comprehension connections, inferencing, strategies for active engagement, socio-cultural influences on reading, reading/writing relationships, text sets, and assessment of content reading. NOTE: Open to professional educators.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41365
MS_ED 425-0 Fundamentals of Writing Process-Elementary

The course presents current theory and practice related to writing processes, with emphasis on personal writing experiences, including topic selection, drafting, conferencing, revising, editing, and publishing. Other topics include evaluation, writing in various genres, motivating students to write and management of writing workshops. NOTE: Open to professional educators.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/26/14 - 07/31/14 Th 6 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41371
MS_ED 427-0 Educating Exceptional Children

Exceptional children have unique characteristics - physiological, intellectual, and social-emotional. This course examines these characteristics and etiological factors, as well as trends in legislation, educational programming and approaches to instruction for students with disabilities. NOTE: Open to professional educators.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41368
MS_ED 428-0 Dynamics of Middle School Curriculum

The objective of this course is for students to understand and explore the dynamic environment of middle schools and young adolescents, and to consider the impact of middle school principles, structures and practices on classroom learning and instruction. Students will examine the unique characteristics of middle school learning and the educational needs of young adolescent learners, and they will compare and contrast a variety of middle school models, including policy statements, visions and reform proposals. Students will share and consider their personal experiences, and those of the entire class, as they investigate the many and varied issues that impact any middle school and its community.

Major topics include public policy issues, adolescent development, standards and curriculum, measures of intelligence, learning differences, school structure and culture, instructional relationships and strategies, literacy and reading in the content areas, the development of critical thinking skills, culturally responsive and equitable practices, interdisciplinary instruction, assessment methods, middle school leadership, and technology. Given the important transitions and cognitive milestones that occur during the middle school years, we will consider efforts to strike a balance between rigorous curriculum standards and developmentally appropriate modes of learning. We will consider the views and proposals of many of the parties with an interest in middle grades reform, and students will be given an opportunity to research and share their knowledge of particular subjects.

NOTE: Open to professional educators

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/28/14 M 6 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MS_ED 430-0 Topics in Teaching & Learning; Seminar on Interpretive Discussion

NOTE: Open to professional educators

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/25/14 - 07/30/14 W noon – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MS_ED 441-DL Differentiating Instruction for Gifted Learners

Students examine the research base behind instructional strategies and their efficacy with different types of learners. They study assessment and accommodation/modification techniques from cross-grade level, school, and district perspectives. NOTE: Open to professional educators.

Summer 2014 Sec #26 (441-DL)
06/23/14 - 08/02/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Online Open Caesar ID: 41374
MS_ED 461-0 Topics in Teacher Leadership: Formative and Benchmark Assessment

Students will explore formative and benchmark assessments used to diagnose and redesign learning opportunities for K-12 students. We will investigate the validity and reliability of measurement strategies and the use of data to inform instruction and practice techniques for using formative classroom assessments to inform instruction.

NOTE: Open to professional educators

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/28/14 M 5 – 8 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41468
Music: Master Classes, Symposia, and Workshops

MUSIC: PERFORMANCE INSTITUTES, MASTER CLASSES, SEMINARS, SYMPOSIA AND WORKSHOPS

Registration for Bienen School of Music Summer Performance Institutes, Master Classes, Seminars, Symposia and Workshops, either for credit or non-credit, must be done through the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment. All tuition amounts listed are for non-credit registration. There is an additional charge for registering for any performance program for university credit. For registration materials and special instructions, contact the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment at 847-491-3141 or summermusic@northwestern.edu.

Applications for Bienen School of Music Summer Performance Institutes, Master Classes, Seminars, Symposia and Workshops must be submitted via the Audition Dropbox, located on the Bienen School website at www.music.northwestern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Upon creating a file in the Dropbox, applicants should select “Visiting Student (Summer Session)” as their application type, and then select the workshop to which you are applying. This will ensure that your file is distributed to the correct reviewers. No separate application form is necessary--do not submit an application to Northwestern University via the Common Application or Graduate Music Online Application. Applicants will be asked to upload a detailed resume as well as all audition requirements for the performance offerings. NOTE: No paper applications will be accepted. Do not mail recordings to the Bienen School of Music or to faculty, as these will not be reviewed or returned.

Detailed audition requirements, deadlines and participation dates for all Summer Performance Offerings can be found online at www.music.northwestsern.edu/academics/summer-session.

Applications submitted via the Audition Dropbox will be reviewed in a timely manner. Students who are accepted to participate in a performance program will be notified via email, and will receive payment deadline information, enrollment paperwork, and other admission materials. Participation in a performance program is not guaranteed until full payment has been received by the Bienen School of Music.

Please note that auditors to summer Performance Programs are not required to apply, but we encourage you register in advance by emailing summermusic@northwestern.edu to ensure you have a seat in the class.

The offering of any summer program is dependent on a minimum number of registered participants and subject to cancellation if the required registration does not materialize by the registration deadlines.

MUSIC 330-0 Performance Practicum: Guitar Workshop

This intensive six-day program is designed to develop strong technical ability, advanced musical skills, thorough knowledge of repertoire and healthy practice habits. Students will participate in master classes, ensembles, technique classes and private lessons. The six-day workshop will culminate in a concert of student solo and ensemble performances. Guitar Workshop faculty will include Anne Waller, Senior Lecturer in Guitar, Northwestern University Bienen School of Music; Mark Maxwell, Coordinator of Guitar Studies, DePaul University School of Music and Guitar Instructor, Northwestern Music Academy; and Oscar Ghiglia, internationally renowned concert artist and Professor emeritus of the Basel Music Akademie.

 

Audition requirements: An on-campus audition or submission of a digital audio or video recording of two contrasting pieces from the standard classical guitar literature. To arrange the on-campus audition, please contact Prof. Waller directly at a-waller@northwestern.edu.

 

Applications must be submitted via the Audition Dropbox, located on the Bienen School website at www.music.northwestern.edu/academics/summer-session. Upon creating a file in the Dropbox, applicants should select “Visiting Student (Summer Session)” as their application type, and then select the workshop to which you are applying. This will ensure that your file is distributed to the correct reviewers. No separate application form is necessary--do not submit an application to Northwestern University via the Common Application or Graduate Music Online Application. Applicants will be asked to upload a detailed resume as well as all audition requirements for the performance offerings. NOTE: No paper applications will be accepted. Do not mail recordings to the Bienen School of Music or to faculty, as these will not be reviewed or returned.

 

The deadline for participant applications is April 14, 2014. Auditors are encouraged. The deadline for accepted participant registration with full tuition due is May 9, 2014.

 

Participant Tuition: $600; Full Program Youth Auditor: $150; Per Day Auditor: $60 (non-credit)

 

For more information contact the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment at 847-491-3141 or summermusic@northwestern.edu.

Summer 2014 Sec #01


Schedule Notes:

One week, Evanston Campus, June 14-19, 2014

Sa 12 noon-4:00 pm, Su 10:00 am-5:00 pm, MTWTh 9:00 am-5:00 pm

06/14/14 - 06/19/14 MTuWThF
Sat, 12n to 4pm.; Sun. 10am-5pm
9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Lutkin Hall
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 330-0 Performance Practicum: Voice Institute: The Naked Voice

The Institute will be an exposé and application of the principles discussed in "The Naked Voice: A Wholistic Approach to Singing" by W. Stephen Smith (Oxford University Press, 2007) for singers and voice teachers. For the singers it will include private lessons, master classes, acting classes, dramatic coachings, and a performance of opera scenes. For the teachers it will include five two-hour seminars on voice technique and pedagogy in a lecture/master class format along with the opportunity to participate in the acting classes and to observe the singers' private lessons and master classes. Lessons, master classes, and seminars will be taught by W. Stephen Smith. Acting classes, dramatic coachings, and scene staging will be by Gene Roberts. Singers should have completed at least three years of collegiate level training. Teachers should have collegiate level voice teaching experience. Space is limited to 10 singers and 10 teachers.

 

Audition and application requirements: Singers - a digital video of two opera arias in different languages and one other selection of your choice (art song or music theatre piece). Teachers - a digital audio recording of three selections of your choice. All materials are to be submitted via the Audition Dropbox, located on the Bienen School website at http://www.music.northwestern.edu/academics/summer-session. Upon creating a file in the Dropbox, applicants should select "Visiting Student (Summer Session)" as their application type, and then select the workshop to which you are applying. This will ensure that your file is distributed to the correct reviewers. No separate application form is necessary--DO NOT submit an application to Northwestern University via the Common Application or Graduate Music Online Application. Applicants will be asked to upload detailed résumés as well as all audition requirements. NOTE: No paper application will be accepted. Do not mail recordings as these will not be reviewed or returned.

 

The deadline for participant application is April 14, 2014. Those accepted for participation will be notified by April 21, 2014. The deadline for accepted participant registration with full tuition due is May 9, 2014.

 

Participant Tuition: $650; Full Program Auditor: $400

 

For more information contact the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment at 847-491-3141 or summermusic@northwestern.edu.


Additional Information:

W. Stephen Smith joined the voice faculty at Northwestern University in 2011 after 13 years at The Juilliard School. He has been in the voice faculty of the Aspen Music Festival and School since 1996. He has taught at Santa Fe Opera and Opera on the Avalon, Curtis Institute of Music, Teachers College of Columbia University, University of Southern California, Los Angeles Young Artist Program, and the Metropolitan Opera's Lindemann Young Artist Program. Mr. Smith was on the staff of Houston Grand Opera as Voice Instructor for the Houston Opera Studio from 1990 to 2003. He has given master classes and clinics throughout the United States and has been a guest lecturer at the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, Brazil and at Yonsei University in Seoul, Republic of Korea.

 

Gene Roberts, Director of Opera Theater at Metropolitan State College of Denver, counts opera director Sally Stunkel and Britten specialist Colin Graham among his mentors. His students have appeared on London’s West End, in Germany, and on US National tours. As a performer he was part of the Swiss premier cast of Webber’s Phantom of the Opera in Basel. In Stuttgart he played the role of The Beast in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast in the German production. He played Mr. Eager in the workshop of the Des Moines Metro Opera production of A Room with a View and the Town Crier in the Houston Miller Theater revised premier of Bilby’s Doll with Carlisle Floyd as director. Other roles include Chevalier de la Force (Dialogues of the Carmelites), Don Basilio and Antonio (Le Nozze di Figaro), Bardolfo (Falstaff), Normano (Lucia di Lammermoor), and Gherardo (Gianni Schicchi).

Summer 2014 Sec #02


Schedule Notes:

One week, Evanston campus, June 14-20, 2014

SaSuMTWThF, 10:00am-6:30 pm, with a final performance June 20 at 7:30pm

MAB 109 and 413 (final performance in Lutkin Hall)

06/14/14 - 08/20/14 MTuWThFSaSu 10 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 330-0 Performance Practicum: Violin Institute

The Summer Violin Institute is an intensive two-week program that offers participants the opportunity to work with renowned violin faculty. The master class format provides a unique environment for students to receive individual instruction while also benefiting from knowledge imparted to the group in a collective setting. The program is designed to develop strong technical ability, advanced musical skills, thorough knowledge of repertoire and healthy practice habits. Students will participate in a variety of master classes, technique classes and performances.

Audition requirements: A digital audio recording including the first movement of a Violin Concerto from the standard repertoire and the first movement of a Bach solo Sonata or Partita (10 minutes total).

Applications must be submitted via the Audition Dropbox, located on the Bienen School website at www.music.northwestern.edu/academics/summer-session. Upon creating a file in the Dropbox, applicants should select “Visiting Student (Summer Session)” as their application type, and then select the workshop to which you are applying. This will ensure that your file is distributed to the correct reviewers. No separate application form is necessary--do not submit an application to Northwestern University via the Common Application or Graduate Music Online Application. Applicants will be asked to upload a detailed resume as well as all audition requirements for the performance offerings. NOTE: No paper applications will be accepted. Do not mail recordings to the Bienen School of Music or to faculty, as these will not be reviewed or returned.

 

The deadline for participant applications is April 14, 2014. Auditors are encouraged. The deadline for accepted participant registration with full tuition due is May 9, 2014.

 

Participant tuition: $825, Full Program Auditors: $500, Day Auditors (2 sessions): $60, Per Session Auditors: $30

 

For more information contact the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment at 847-491-3141 or summermusic@northwestern.edu.


Additional Information:

Monday, June 23

9:30 am –10:00 am Registration

10:00 am – 12:30 pm Masterclass – Cyrus Forough

1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Masterclass – Cyrus Forough

 

Tuesday, June 24

10:00 am – 12:30 pm Masterclass – Joel Smirnoff

1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Masterclass – Joel Smirnoff

4:30 pm – 5:30 pm Instrument maintenance, string selection

 

Wednesday, June 25

10:00 am – 12:30 pm Masterclass –Blair Milton

1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Masterclass –Blair Milton

4:30 pm – 5:30 pm Historical recordings: Masters of the violin – past and present.

 

Thursday, June 26

9:00 am – 10:00 am Scale Slam

10:00 am – 12:30 pm Masterclass –Blair Milton

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Masterclass –Miriam Fried

4:30 pm – 5:30 pm Improving sight-reading with intervals

 

Friday, June 27

9:00 am – 10:00 am Spiccatto Slam

10:00 am – 12:30 pm Masterclass – Shmuel Ashkenasi

1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Masterclass – Shmuel Ashkenasi

4:30 pm – 5:30 pm Long-Term Injury Prevention for the Violinist

 

Saturday, June 28

1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Masterclass – Blair Milton

7:30 pm Recital – MCR

Sunday, June 29

No program activities

 

Monday, June 30

8:30 am – 11:00 pm Masterclass – Paul Kantor

12:00 pm – 2:30 pm Masterclass – Paul Kantor

3:30 – 5:30 pmGreat Violins – a discussion by Joe Bein from Bein and Fushi

 

Tuesday, July 1

9am - 10am – Scales, technique

10:00 am – 12:30 pm Masterclass – Blair Milton

1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Masterclass – Frank Almond

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Historical recordings Masters of the violin – past and present.

 

Wednesday, July 2

10:00 am – 12:30 pm Masterclass – Blair Milton

1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Masterclass – Blair Milton

7:30 pm – Recital - MCR

 

Thursday, July 3

10:00 am – 12:30 pm Masterclass – Gerardo Ribeiro

1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Masterclass – Gerardo Ribeiro

 

Friday, July 4

10:00 am – 12:30 pm Masterclass – Gerardo Ribeiro

1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Masterclass – Gerardo Ribeiro

 

Summer 2014 Sec #03


Schedule Notes:

Two Weeks, Evanston Campus, June 23-July 4, 2014

MTWThF, 1:30-5:00 pm, Sa 1:30-4:00 pm

06/23/14 - 07/04/14 MTuWThF
Saturday
1:30 – 5 p.m.
1:30-4:00pm
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 330-0 Performance Practicum: Trombone Master Classes

This summer trombone workshop will feature an exhaustive exposure to fundamentals, training for orchestral auditions, master classes focusing on the interpretation of solo literature, and chamber music performance. Michael Mulcahy appears around the globe as a soloist and teacher. He has led Northwestern's trombone studio since 1999 and his students occupy major positions in orchestras worldwide, including the Boston Symphony Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony and the Berlin Philharmonic. A member of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra since 1989, Mulcahy is also principal trombone with Chicago's Music of the Baroque and the Grand Teton Music Festival. Previously he was principal trombone with Australia's Tasmanian Symphony and Melbourne Symphony and solo trombone with the Cologne Radio Symphony.

 

Audition requirements: A digital audio recording of selections made in the same location, unaccompanied, with no editing within an individual excerpt. Tenor trombone: Saint Saën’s Cavatine (for high school and undergraduate students only); Martin’s Ballade, beginning to figure 14 (for graduate students and professionals); Mozart’s Requiem, Tuba mirum, 2nd trombone solo; Berlioz’s Hungarian March, 2nd trombone parts (from 6 measures before rehearsal 4 through the 2nd measure of rehearsal 5); Ravel’s Bolero, 1st trombone solo (3rd measure of rehearsal 10 to rehearsal 11); Wagner’s Ride of the Valkyries (major only). Bass trombone: Lededev’s Concerto, beginning to end of cadenza (for high school and undergraduate students only); Spillman’s Concerto, beginning to letter H (for graduate students and professionals); Bach’s Cello Suite No.5, Sarabande; Berlioz’s Hungarian March; Wagner’s Ride of the Valkyries (2nd major section only).

 

Applications must be submitted via the Audition Dropbox, located on the Bienen School website at www.music.northwestern.edu/academics/summer-session. Upon creating a file in the Dropbox, applicants should select “Visiting Student (Summer Session)” as their application type, and then select the workshop to which you are applying. This will ensure that your file is distributed to the correct reviewers. No separate application form is necessary--do not submit an application to Northwestern University via the Common Application or Graduate Music Online Application. Applicants will be asked to upload a detailed resume as well as all audition requirements for the performance offerings. NOTE: No paper applications will be accepted. Do not mail recordings to the Bienen School of Music or to faculty, as these will not be reviewed or returned.

 

The deadline for performer applications is April 14, 2014. Auditors are encouraged. The deadline for accepted participant registration with full tuition due is May 9, 2014.

 

Participant Tuition: $650, Full Program Auditors: $400, Day Auditors: $80 (non-credit)

 

For more information contact the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment at 847-491-3141 or summermusic@northwestern.edu.

Summer 2014 Sec #04


Schedule Notes:

One Week, Evanston Campus, June 30 – July 4, 2014

 MTWThF, 10am–5pm


Course Materials:

MUSIC 330-0-04 Performance Practicum 0-1.0 credit (additional charge to register for credit)

MUSIC 430-0-04 Materials, Performance Practice and Pedagogy 0-1.0 credit

One Week, Evanston Campus, June 30-July 4, 2014

MTWThF, daytime sessions 10 am-5 pm

Regenstein Master Class Room

Participant Tuition: $650, Full Program Auditors: $400, Per Day Auditors: $80 (non-credit)

Michael Mulcahy

06/30/14 - 07/04/14 MTuWThF 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 330-0 Performance Practicum: Conducting and Wind Music Symposium

Taught by Mallory Thompson, Director of Bands at Northwestern University and Eugene Migliaro Corporon, conductor of the Wind Symphony and Regents Professor of Music at the University of North Texas, the symposium is designed to enhance your conducting, teaching and musical skills. Participants will be sent a list of scores to prepare in advance, and the repertoire will include a variety of works for ensembles of various levels. Works to be studied include established masterworks as well as new music for winds. In addition to conducting a live ensemble and receiving feedback from the faculty, participants will attend lectures and discussions on choosing repertoire, score study, rehearsal techniques, movement and music interpretation. The symposium is recommended for conductors of all levels with a desire to learn and explore new ideas. Preference will be given to those with a completed bachelor's degree and some experience.

 

No Audition requirements.

 

Participant registration is limited to 29 individuals. Registration with full payment is required to reserve your participation and will be accepted until the symposium is filled. Early submission is highly advisable. Payments must be received no later than June 13, 2014. There is no limit for those interested in auditing. Applications must be submitted via the Audition Dropbox, located on the Bienen School website at www.music.northwestern.edu/academics/summer-session. Upon creating a file in the Dropbox, applicants should select “Visiting Student (Summer Session)” as their application type, and then select the workshop to which you are applying. This will ensure that your file is distributed to the correct reviewers. No separate application form is necessary--do not submit an application to Northwestern University via the Common Application or Graduate Music Online Application. Applicants will be asked to upload a detailed resume as well as all audition requirements for the performance offerings. NOTE: No paper applications will be accepted. Do not mail recordings to the Bienen School of Music or to faculty, as these will not be reviewed or returned.  

 

 Participant Tuition: $625, Full Program Auditor: $400, Day Auditor: $80 (non-credit). 0-1.0 credit (additional charge to register for credit)

 

For more information contact the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment at 847-491-3141 or summermusic@northwestern.edu.

Summer 2014 Sec #05
07/06/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF
Sunday
8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
4-8pm
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 330-0 Performance Practicum: Percussion Workshop for Music Educators

The most comprehensive system for teaching percussion will be introduced and demonstrated, and it can be used for all percussion instruments. The course includes lectures, demonstrations, hands-on training, listening sessions, discussions of percussion solo and ensemble literature, method books, selecting literature, and participating in percussion ensemble rehearsal. The following percussion instruments will be discussed—snare drum, xylophone, cymbals, timpani, marimba, vibraphone, tambourine, triangle, bass drum, glockenspiel, drumset, chimes, marching percussion and world percussion. This workshop is designed for all band directors, orchestra directors, percussion teachers, or simply anyone interested in learning the comprehensive approach to percussion pedagogy.

 

No Audition requirements.

 

Applications must be submitted via the Audition Dropbox, located on the Bienen School website at www.music.northwestern.edu/academics/summer-session. Upon creating a file in the Dropbox, applicants should select “Visiting Student (Summer Session)” as their application type, and then select the workshop to which you are applying. This will ensure that your file is distributed to the correct reviewers. No separate application form is necessary--do not submit an application to Northwestern University via the Common Application or Graduate Music Online Application. Applicants will be asked to upload a detailed resume for the performance offerings. NOTE: No paper applications will be accepted.

 

The deadline for participant applications is May 30, 2014. Auditors are encouraged. The deadline for accepted participant registration with full tuition due is June 13, 2014.

 

Participant Tuition: $225; Per Day Auditor: $125

 

For more information contact the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment at 847-491-3141 or summermusic@northwestern.edu.

 

Summer 2014 Sec #06


Schedule Notes:

Instructors:

She-e Wu (Northwestern University), Chris Lamb (New York Philharmonic), Paul Wertico (Drumset artist), Ruben Alvarez (Afro-Cuban/Latin Percussion), Dave Eisenreich (Evanston High School)

07/12/14 - 07/13/14 SaSu
Sunday
9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
9am-4pm
Regenstein Hall 011
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 330-0 Performance Practicum: Summer Oboe Workshop

This intensive three-day program is designed to create a more comprehensive knowledge of the most important aspects of oboe playing and reed making. Students will participate in master classes and some private instruction. The three-day workshop will culminate in a faculty concert. Oboe Workshop faculty will include Robert Morgan, Michael Henoch and Scott Hostetler, all members of the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music oboe faculty.

 

Audition requirements: None for college-age students enrolled in a Music program. High School students need to submit a digital audio recording of 2-3 minutes duration of a selection of their choice from the standard classical oboe literature.

 

Applications must be submitted via the Audition Dropbox, located on the Bienen School website at www.music.northwestern.edu/academics/summer-session. Upon creating a file in the Dropbox, applicants should select “Visiting Student (Summer Session)” as their application type, and then select the workshop to which you are applying. This will ensure that your file is distributed to the correct reviewers. No separate application form is necessary--do not submit an application to Northwestern University via the Common Application or Graduate Music Online Application. Applicants will be asked to upload a detailed resume as well as all audition requirements for the performance offerings. NOTE: No paper applications will be accepted. Do not mail recordings to the Bienen School of Music or to faculty, as these will not be reviewed or returned.

 

Participant Tuition: $390; Full Program Auditor: $250; Per Day Auditor: $90

 

The deadline for participant applications is May 30, 2014. Space is limited to a maximum of 18 participants so early registration is advised. Auditors are encouraged. The deadline for accepted participant registration with full tuition due is June 13, 2014.

 

For more information contact the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment at 847-491-3141 or summermusic@northwestern.edu.


Additional Information:

Robert Morgan is solo English horn and assistant principal oboe for the Lyric Opera of Chicago Orchestra. He is also principal oboist for the Music of the Baroque and Chicago Philharmonic Orchestra. Robert is a frequent soloist with numerous area orchestras and musical organizations and has performed at the White House with Music of the Baroque and with members of the Guarnieri Quartet in Maryland.

 

Michael Henoch is assistant principal oboe of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, where he has been member since 1972. Artistic co-director and oboist with the Chicago Chamber Musicians, he has also performed at the Marlboro Music Festival, Carmel Bach Festival, Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center, and the Peninsula Music Festival. Henoch has served as a soloist under such conductors as Daniel Barenboim, Sir Georg Solti, David Zinman, Alexander Schneider, and has collaborated with Pierre Boulez, Christoph Eschenbach, Claude Frank, Garrick Ohlsson, Arlene Auger, and Maxim Vengerov.

 

Scott Hostetler is a member of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. He was formerly the principal oboist and artist in residence of the Kalamazoo (MI) Symphony Orchestra. Hostetler has also performed with the Michigan Opera Theatre, the Florida Orchestra, and the Cleveland Orchestra during its 1999 European tour. At age 16, he was heard in the Mozart Quartet for Oboe and Strings with members of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra.

Summer 2014 Sec #07


Schedule Notes:

Three Days, Evanston Campus, July11-13, 2014

FSaSu, 9:30 am – 9:00 pm

 

07/11/14 - 07/13/14 FSaSu 9:30 a.m. – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 330-0 Performance Practicum: A Vocal Career Seminar

This career seminar will consist of lectures and master classes with international opera singer Pamela Hinchman, associate professor of voice at Northwestern University. In these classes you will learn how to audition for an agent, an opera company, and a musical theater company. The seminar will identify pieces that will make you your most marketable product and then help you to perfect them. Additionally, these sessions will address how a singer can most effectively create a dynamic résumé and bio, give advice on the proper photo for your voice type, and provide clarity and assistance with tax issues. Guest speakers may include a New York agent for opera and musical theater, a tax specialist, a photographer, an opera conductor and a stage director. At the end of the seminar each performer will audition for a New York agent. Space is limited so early submission of participant applications is advisable.

 

Pamela Hinchman has performed at New York’s Carnegie Hall and Avery Fischer Hall as well as with the Hong Kong Philharmonic and the Pittsburgh, Wichita, Columbus, Harrisburg, Connecticut, Kansas City, West Virginia, Cairo (Egypt), and Calgary Symphony Orchestras. Winner of the Prix Spéciale in Belgium’s International Bel Canto Competition, she has also appeared with the Cleveland Opera, Mansfield Opera, Pittsburgh Opera, Opera New England, Opera Company of Boston, Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie (Belgium), Nashville Opera, Florida Grand Opera, Chicago Opera Theatre, Austin Opera, and Lyric Opera of Kansas City.

 

Audition requirements: A digital audio recording of three selections of your choice. Participants should prepare two works for the master classes.

 

Applications must be submitted via the Audition Dropbox, located on the Bienen School website at www.music.northwestern.edu/academics/summer-session. Upon creating a file in the Dropbox, applicants should select “Visiting Student (Summer Session)” as their application type, and then select the workshop to which you are applying. This will ensure that your file is distributed to the correct reviewers. No separate application form is necessary--do not submit an application to Northwestern University via the Common Application or Graduate Music Online Application. Applicants will be asked to upload a detailed resume as well as all audition requirements for the performance offerings. NOTE: No paper applications will be accepted. Do not mail recordings to the Bienen School of Music or to faculty, as these will not be reviewed or returned.

 

The deadline for participant applications is May 30, 2014. Auditors are encouraged. The deadline for accepted participant registration with full tuition due is June 13, 2014.


Participant Tuition: $650, Full Program Auditor: $400, Day Auditor: $80

For more information contact the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment at 847-491-3141 or summermusic@northwestern.edu.


Summer 2014 Sec #08


Schedule Notes:

One Week, Evanston Campus, July 28-August 1, 2014

MTWThF, 2:00-5:00 pm, 6:30-10:30 pm

07/28/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF
M-F
2 – 5 p.m.
6:30-10:30PM
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 330-0 Performance Practicum: Percussion Symposium

Distinguished percussionists from New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Cleveland Orchestra, Boston Symphony, Seattle Symphony, and many more will gather at this Percussion "Think Tank" to discuss styles, sound productions, listening sessions, body movements, strokes, brain in music, memorization, performing, delivery, physical execution, practicing, auditions, instruments and daily technical lab classes on all percussion instruments and performances in master classes.

 

No audition requirements.

 

Applications must be submitted via the Audition Dropbox, located on the Bienen School website at www.music.northwestern.edu/academics/summer-session. Upon creating a file in the Dropbox, applicants should select “Visiting Student (Summer Session)” as their application type, and then select the workshop to which you are applying. This will ensure that your file is distributed to the correct reviewers. No separate application form is necessary--do not submit an application to Northwestern University via the Common Application or Graduate Music Online Application. Applicants will be asked to upload a detailed resume for the performance offerings. NOTE: No paper applications will be accepted.

 

The deadline for performer applications is May 30, 2014. Auditors are encouraged. The deadline for participant registration with full tuition due is June 13, 2014

 

Participant Tuition: $650, Full Program Auditor: $400, Day Auditor: $80

 

For more information contact the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment at 847-491-3141 or summermusic@northwestern.edu.

Summer 2014 Sec #09


Schedule Notes:

One Week, Evanston Campus, July 27-August 2, 2014

MTWThF 9am-10pm, Sun 4:00-8:00 pm, Sat 9:00 am-1 pm

 

06/01/14 - 08/31/14 MTuWThF
See below
9 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 330-0 PRACTICUM IN PERFORMANCE: PIANO PEDAGOGY SYMPOSIUM

The Piano Pedagogy Symposium is designed to enhance the artistry, effectiveness, and efficiency of piano teachers in private lessons and studio class situations. Participants will be presented with creative strategies for teaching reading, guiding technical development, promoting musicianship and listening skills, selecting fresh
and appropriate repertoire, and preparing students for successful performance. Enhancing and promoting the professionalism of teachers will also be a featured topic. Sessions will include lectures, live teaching demonstrations, discussion, and opportunities to gain hands-on access to new literature and materials.

 

Marcia Bosits is Associate Professor of Piano and Director of the Piano Pedagogy Program at Northwestern University. Dr. Bosits has held national positions in respected professional organizations including Music Teachers National Association, the College Music Society, the National Group Piano and Pedagogy Forum, the National Conference on Keyboard Pedagogy and the World Piano Conference. Her articles have appeared in such journals as Clavier, Keyboard Companion, Piano Journal and the American Music Teacher, and she frequently appears as a clinician in piano pedagogy throughout the United States, Canada, Europe and the Far East. Active as a soloist and chamber musician, she has been a guest performer for the European Piano Teachers Association (EPTA) Conferences in Rome, Portugal, and Serbia. Her commitment to training university pianists in artistic teaching and outreach has resulted in invitations to appear as a US delegate to international conferences promoting this innovative pedagogical approach.

 

Scott McBride Smith is a recognized leader in music education. As the Cordelia Brown Murphy Professor of Piano Pedagogy at the University of Kansas, he focuses on national issues of teacher training and piano pedagogy. As President and CEO of the International Institute for Young Musicians, he leads a summer program offering specialized training for gifted young performers from around the world. A co-author of the groundbreaking new series American Popular Piano, he has helped create an inspiring course of study for today's students. He is also co-author of the college text The Well-Tempered Keyboard Teacher and associate editor of the magazine Clavier Companion. Dr. Smith has served as Visiting Professor at the Bela Bartok Conservatory in Lima, Peru; at the Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts; in China, at the Sichaun Conservatory of Music and at the Shenzhen Arts School; and in Taiwan, sponsored by the International Piano Teaching Foundation.

 

Applicants should submit a CV describing their educational background and previous teaching experience.

 

The deadline for applications is May 30, 2014. Auditors are encouraged. The deadline for participant registration with full tuition due is June 13, 2014.

 

Participant Tuition: $225; Per Day Auditor: $90


For more information contact the Northwestern University Bienen School of Music Office of Admission, Financial Aid and Enrollment at 847-491-3141 or summermusic@northwestern.edu.

Summer 2014 Sec #10
07/30/14 - 08/01/14 WThF 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 397-0 Summer Internship

Internship in a music or arts related field. Times and duties vary by assignment.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 08/16/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 430-0 Materials, Performance Practice, and Pedagogy: Guitar Workshop

See MUSIC 330-0 Sec. 01 for course description.

Summer 2014 Sec #01
06/14/14 - 06/19/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 430-0 Materials, Performance Practice, and Pedagogy: Summer Voice Institute

See MUSIC 330-0 Sec. 02 for course description.

Summer 2014 Sec #02
06/14/14 - 06/20/14 MTuWThF
Saturday and Sunday
10 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.
10am-6:30pm
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 430-0 Materials, Performance Practice, and Pedagogy: Violin Institute

Please see course description of 330-0, section 03.

Summer 2014 Sec #03
06/23/14 - 07/04/14 MTuWThFSa
MTWThF
1:30 – 4 p.m.
4-5pm
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 430-0 Materials, Performance practice and Pedagogy: Trombone Master Class

See course description under 330-0 section 04

Summer 2014 Sec #04
06/30/14 - 07/04/14 MTuWThF 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 430-0 Materials, Performance Practice, and Pedagogy: Conducting and Wind Music Symposium

See MUSIC 330-0 Sec. 05 for course description.

Summer 2014 Sec #05
07/06/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF
Sunday
8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
4-8pm
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 430-0 Materials, Performance Practice, and Pedagogy: A Vocal Career Seminar

See MUSIC 330-0 Sec. 08 for course description.

Summer 2014 Sec #08
07/28/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF
MTWThF
2 – 5 p.m.
6-10:30pm
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC 430-0 Materials, Performance Practice, and Pedagogy: Percussion Symposium

See MUSIC 330-0, Section 09 for description.

Summer 2014 Sec #09
07/27/14 - 08/02/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open
Music Education
MUSIC_ED 335-0 Selected Topics in Music Ed: World Music Experiences in the Curriculum

Participants will explore rich possibilities for formative world music experiences by working with guest artists using authentic instmments from Indonesia and West Africa, learning foundational techniques to play and instruct others to play these instruments, and investigating methods and approaches for implementation of such experiences in the music classroom. No previous experience working with Indonesian or West African
instmmcnts is required.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh
Friday
1 – 3 p.m.
1-2pm
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC_ED 368-0 Composition in Schools

This course will examine practical and research literature for incorporating composition and improvisation in music classes. Applications and design of curricular materials for teaching sequences dealing with composition and improvisation will be examined for all music teaching situations -instrumental, vocal, general -and for all ages.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/24/14 - 08/01/14 TuTh
Friday
10 a.m. – noon
11am-12pm
MAB 219
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC_ED 421-0 Philosophical Basis of Music Education

This course is designed to stimulate your thinking concerning your role as a music educator, as well as the role of music in the greater educational enterprise. This will be accomplished by considering fundamental and significant questions: Why do humans value music in their lives? Is music important enough to be taught formally in schools? Is music education a right or a privilege? How does music education align and/or misalign with broad educational goals? There are no simple answers to these questions. However, many scholars have utilized philosophical modes of inquiry to answer these questions. In this course you will explore some of the philosophical principles, concepts and ideas that provide music education with purpose and direction. Grappling with these ideas will improve your knowledge and understanding of the things you do as a music educator. It will also help you articulate the importance of music in schools to the various constituencies you serve. This course is recommended for master's students in their second summer.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 8 – 10 a.m. MAB 229
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC_ED 422-0 Curriculum Development in Music Education

Curriculum development and evaluation in music education raises fundamental questions about the purposes and characteristics of music programs in school settings. Curriculum as a field of study often draws upon closely related foundational disciplines- history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, and educational policy studies - to examine what is taught and learned in music classrooms. We will also draw upon these fields to understand contemporary curriculum theory and practice, as well as to examine educational policies and their impact on music programs, particularly in this climate of school reform. Students will analyze and critique available curricular models, and design comprehensive programs to foster students' musical growth.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MW
Friday
10 a.m. – noon
10-11am.
MAB 229
Evanston Campus Open
MUSIC_ED 485-0 MM Project

Students will complete projects to fulfill their final exam requirements.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open
Musicology
MUSICOL 355-0 Topics in 20th Century Music: Rethinking the 20th Century

Is it possible to imagine a coherent history of music since 1900 that takes into account not only Schoenberg and Stravinsky, but also Ellington and Elvis? That includes both Messiaen and Madonna, both Missy Elliott and Elliott Carter? Whether coherent or contradictory, these names begin to sketch out the musical legacies that the 20th century has bequeathed, and recent scholarship has begun to complicate our understanding of this era, displacing the familiar narratives of modernist progress in favor of something both richer and more confusing. This course will examine a variety of musical crossovers and confrontations in order to revise and broaden our conception of the significance and value of the past 100+ years of music.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 3 – 5 p.m. MAB 125
Evanston Campus Open
Organization Behavior
ORG_BEH 301-CN Organization Behavior

The interaction of individuals in formal organizations. Theory and research integrated with cases and exercises to develop understanding of the dynamics of motivation, communication, group decision making, leadership, intergroup relations, power, and conflict. Students are encouraged to apply this knowledge to managing relationships with superiors, subordinates, and colleagues in their own work settings. There is an hour long break for lunch during each class meeting. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2014 Sec #24
06/28/14 - 07/19/14 Sa 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40976
ORG_BEH 307-CN Leadership Principles

Leadership is one of the most common words used in business conversations. Understanding how to develop leadership competency at the institutional, team, and individual levels is key to success. The goal of this course is to help students define their own vision of leadership within the context of proven leadership strategies in order to be more effective in their professional roles. Topics include leadership competency frameworks; development strategies; the role of team; feedback; communication and change management. Case studies, in-class discussions, and group interaction are used to stimulate self-discovery and to experience leadership issues firsthand. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/25/14 - 07/30/14 W 6 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41027
ORG_BEH 309-CN Human Resource Management

The course will explore how HR has evolved from its inception to the present day HR function - and the direction organizations need it to continue to move toward. The majority of the course will focus on ensuring the students learn that to be an effective leader within any organization, they must consider themselves as Human Resources Managers. To accomplish this, each student will learn the key responsibilities and competencies of a cutting-edge Human Resources leader. This course was formerly ORG BEH 320 Human Resource Management. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. For the online component, students must have ready access to the Internet. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2014 Sec #25
06/24/14 - 08/12/14 Tu 6 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41047
ORG_BEH 391-CN Topics in Management: Negotiating Strategies

Key negotiating skills are examined along with specific planning and communication strategies. Students evaluate their persuasion strengths, plan for negotiations to achieving win-win results both inside and outside their organizations, improve communication skills, identify tactics and appropriate responses, and practice strategies. Also covers negotiating in an international environment. Readings, case studies, simulations. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course. First class attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2014 Sec #24
08/09/14 - 08/30/14 Sa 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40977
Performance Studies
PERF_ST 332-0 Urban Festivity

This course will introduce students to ethnographic field research in performance studies by focusing on urban festivals, celebrations, spectacles, exhibitions, and other displays of civic, ethnic, and neighborhood identity. Taking advantage of the ethnographic riches and resources of summertime Chicagoland, we will approach the city as theatre, asking always: How does Chicago (or another city to which you have access) perform its identity? Consolidate or contest ethnic identities, class difference, and neighborhood boundaries through performance? How are issues of ethnicity, diversity, and civility negotiated in performance? How does the reconstruction of history articulate with the redevelopment and gentrification projects in neighborhood festivals? How do the sacred performances of religious communities fit into the urban experience? And how do marginal, underground, and/or transgressive performance practices--(such as those of street preachers, street vendors, streetwalkers, street gangs, and so forth)--articulate with officially sanctioned cosmopolitan displays of urbanity? We will be interested in the social, political-economic, and performative dimensions of everything from Taste of Chicago (largest festival in the world), Chicago Pride Parade , Fourth of July festivities, the North Shore Ravinia Music Festival, sidewalk sales, flea markets, family picnics, and more.

 

Students will produce a portfolio of field notes and visual/aural documentation, a short critical essay, and a creative presentation of their research.

 

Class will meet Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from noon-5pm (June 23-July 12) and 11am-3pm on Sunday, June 29. A final exam/presentations session is scheduled from 2-5pm on Saturday, July 12.

 

Visits to the following festivals/events are required:

June 27: Chicago Gospel Music Festival

June 29: Chicago LGBTQ Pride Parade

July 4: Fourth of July Festivities

July 11: Taste of Chicago

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/12/14 WThF
6/29 11-3pm; 7/12 1-5pm
noon – 5 p.m. AMS 103
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41879
Philosophy
PHIL 110-0 Introduction to Philosophy

This course seeks to introduce students to philosophy by examining some of its central problems through classical and contemporary texts. Topics to be discussed in the course include the mind-body problem, the nature of good and evil, and free will. Students will acquire the necessary skills to (i) read carefully and critically engage with texts that exhibit different forms of philosophical argumentation; (ii) to develop their own views about the topics to be discussed; (iii) to present and defend their ideas in a clear and forceful way.

 This course counts toward the Weinberg College ethics and values distribution requirement, Area V.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40238
PHIL 150-0 Elementary Logic I

Everyone argues. And when we argue--at least when we do so correctly--we offer premises in support of a conclusion. Logic is the study of a peculiar kind of support between premises and conclusions. That peculiar support is called 'implication': premises imply a conclusion whenever the truth of the premises guarantees the truth of the conclusion.

This class introduces students to formal tools for evaluating and constructing arguments in terms of implication. We will learn how to reveal the basic logical features of everyday English sentences, and we will use those features to give a formal account of implication. With that account in hand, we will learn methods for testing whether premises imply conclusions, and for constructing good arguments out of a given set of premises.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh 10 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40018
PHIL 216-0 Introduction to Pragmatism

Topic: Classics of American Pragmatism

Pragmatism is probably the first, but certainly the most important genuinely Northamerican philosophical tradition. The classical writings of Peirce, James, Dewey, and Mead set the stage for a completely new orientation in epistemology, moral and political theory, psychology and many other fields. Basic to all Pragmatist writers is the belief that the active and interactive human being in its natural and social environment has to stand at the center of reflection, thus emphasizing the volitional, procedural, social, and evolutionary aspects of knowledge of any kind. In the seminar, we will get a general view of pragmatist philosophical literature from Peirce to Putnam, including classics like “The Fixation of Belief” (Peirce), “The Will to Believe” (James), “Reconstruction in Philosophy” (Dewey), “Solidarity and Objectivity” (Rorty).

This course counts toward the Weinberg College Ethics and Values distribution requirement, Area V.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41880
PHIL 219-0 Introduction to Existentialism: from Kierkegaard to Sartre

Existentialism is distinguished by its emphasis on themes of the human condition usually neglected in the wider field of philosophy. These include alienation, anxiety, dread, authenticity, and responsibility, to name a few. In this course we will study existentialism through four of its key authors, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre. Through a combination of class discussion and writing assignments, we will examine how each of these authors sought to understand human existence in the wake of the realization that moral values are contingent. We will also explore existentialist themes in some contemporary cinema.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College Ethics and Values distribution requirement, Area V.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/01/14 MWF 9:30 – 11 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40241
PHIL 269-0 Bioethics

An analysis of the ethical issues that arise as a result of developments in medicine and biotechnology. Topics considered will include cloning and stem cell transplantation, human and animal research, new reproductive technologies, the definition of death, abortion, euthanasia, and the allocation of resources. Course Objective: To develop insight into and appreciation for the way philosophical analysis and argument can contribute to clarifying the ethical issues in complex and controversial topics in biotechnology and medicine.

This course counts toward the Weinberg College Ethics and Values distribution requirement, Area V.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6 – 8:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40093
Physics
PHYSICS 130-1 College Physics: Mechanics

Particle kinematics, Newtonian dynamics, work and energy, collisions and momentum, torque and angular momentum, rigid-body statics and dynamics, harmonic oscillations, gravitation. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. Prerequisites: algebra and trigonometry. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40145
PHYSICS 130-2 College Physics: Electricity and Magnetism

Electrostatics, magnetostatics, DC and AC circuits, time-varying fields, Ampere's Law, Gauss's Law. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. Prerequisites: algebra and trigonometry and PHYSICS 130-1 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40144
PHYSICS 130-3 College Physics: Wave Phenomena and Modern Physics

Mechanical waves, sound waves, geometric optics, interference and diffraction, the quantum nature of particles and light, atomic and nuclear phenomena. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. Prerequisites: algebra and trigonometry and PHYSICS 130-2 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40143
PHYSICS 135-1 General Physics: Mechanics

Particle kinematics, Newtonian dynamics, work and energy, collisions and momentum, torque and angular momentum, rigid-body statics and dynamics, harmonic oscillations, gravitation. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. Prerequisites: differential and integral calculus. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40019
PHYSICS 135-2 General Physics: Electricity and Magnetism

Electrostatics, magnetostatics, DC and AC circuits, time-varying fields, Ampere's Law, Gauss's Law. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. Prerequisites: differential and integral calculus and PHYSICS 135-1 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40020
PHYSICS 135-3 General Physics: Wave Phenomena and Modern Physics

Mechanical waves, sound waves, geometric optics, interference and diffraction, the quantum nature of particles and light, atomic and nuclear phenomena. Concurrent registration in PHYSICS 136 laboratory is required. Prerequisites: differential and integral calculus and PHYSICS 135-2 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF
Lab must be scheduled
9 a.m. – noon Tech Institute
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40085
PHYSICS 136-1 Physics Laboratory

This is the required physics laboratory for both the PHYSICS 130-1,2,3 and the PHYSICS 135-1,2,3 sequences. This noncredit, no-fee laboratory may not be waived or taken separately. Students must register separately for each course of the laboratory (136-1, 136-2, 136-3) if they are taking more than one course in either physics sequence. The enrollment in each laboratory section is strictly limited to 20 students. Students must not assume that they are able to take a section at a specific time. Part-time work or other commitments must be arranged so that students can be in alternate laboratory sections should their first choice be closed. The eight-week sequence comprises a total of 24 laboratories, 8 for each course. Laboratories meet on a rotating schedule, meaning that they meet on MTWThF, but not every M, not every T, etc. There are an average of three labs per week. At the start of classes, students receive a syllabus showing the exact days on which laboratories meet. The times for each section are as follows and are the same for each session of the sequence:136-1, 2, 3 Sec. 38: 7-9 am; 136-1, 2, 3 Sec. 48: 1-3 pm; 136-1, 2, 3 Sec. 58: 3-5 pm

Summer 2014 Sec #38, 48, 58
06/23/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open
Political Science
POLI_SCI 240-0 Introduction to International Relations

This course is an introduction to history, concepts, and problems in international politics. Among the questions we will consider are: Where do international order and disorder come from? What are the powers and limits of nation-states? What is ‘globalization’? What power do multinational corporations have? What are the ideas behind UN intervention? Can international law be used to prosecute war criminals?

Much of our attention will be focused on the concepts needed to think about and work in international politics. Concepts such as sovereignty, interests, statehood, and identity are central.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40272
POLI_SCI 309-0 Special Topics in Political Theory: "Contemporary Democratic Theory: Rawls and Habermas"

This is a course in political theory that introduces students to the political thought of the two most influential democratic theorists of the late twentieth century: namely, John Rawls and Jürgen Habermas. The course will study the political and theoretical contributions of those two thinkers by means of studying their responses to the major modern and contemporary controversies in democratic theory, such as: Why is the democratic constitutional state a just system of government? How can the democratic constitutional state claim legitimate authority over an ethically and religiously diverse society? How should we understand the relationship between classical liberal rights and popular sovereignty? How are we to understand the relationship between the political and moral autonomy of democratic citizens? What should the democratic constitutional state do about material inequality? Is civil disobedience justifiable, and if so, under what conditions? What do democratic citizens owe to each other? Can there be transnational or cosmopolitan democracy? And last, but not least, what should we take away from the critical exchange between Rawls and Habermas for questions such as the relation between political theory and political practice?

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41905
POLI_SCI 320-0 The Presidency

This course examines the structural foundations of the American presidency and explores, in depth, predominant scholarly theories of presidential power and leadership within the political science literature. Throughout, we consider the age-old question: is it “the man” or “the times” that makes for presidential greatness? The course does not proceed chronologically, but examples from presidencies across American history are drawn upon liberally throughout. (This course counts toward WCAS Distribution Requirements--Division III, Social and Behavioral Sciences--and fulfills a 300-level course requirement for the Political Science major/minor.)

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40187
POLI_SCI 351-0 Politics of the Middle East

What explains the contagious rise of revolutions and protest movements in the Middle East, after decades of authoritarian rule? Why did the uprisings have wildly differing outcomes, from a quick overthrow of Ben Ali's regime in Tunisia, to a still ongoing revolution-turned-civil war in Syria? This course will center around such empirical puzzles in the politics of the modern Middle East and aims to give students an analytical sense of the “big picture” of interconnected legacies, patterns and trends that unite this extremely diverse region, as well as the differing characteristics and historical trajectories that can help us understand the differences in political outcomes. Since this is a course of comparative politics, we will be concerned mainly with the domestic dynamics of Middle Eastern states and their societies. We will be evaluating competing explanations for variance in political regimes, levels of development, state-society relations and dynamics of protest and contention across the region, with a focus on understanding the political, social and cultural changes that the region's states and societies are undergoing. By the end of this course, students will be able to formulate their own explanations for important contemporary events and processes in Middle East politics, such as the Arab Uprisings and its various tentative outcomes, the rise (and continued success) of political Islam, ethnic and sectarian conflict, neoliberal penetration and new patterns of civic engagement and popular mobilization. They will also develop a critical approach towards mainstream interpretations of the region's political dynamics, history, and culture.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41906
POLI_SCI 361-SA Democratic Transitions: Study Abroad in Prague

This course is taught in Prague; for more information, please call the Study Abroad Office at 847.467.6400

The course explores processes of transition from authoritarian rule to democracy in Europe, and the aftermath of such transition. The course is comparative by nature and presents general issues based on case studies from Western, Central and Eastern Europe. The material is presented from two perspectives: that of a political scientist and that of a leading protagonist of the transition process in Central and Eastern Europe. We will begin with a discussion of Europe as a geopolitical entity and identify its main divisions. We will characterize European non-democratic regimes of the past and turn towards dissident activities of Central and Eastern Europe, and deal with theories of transition as well as specific instances of such transition. Fundamental challenges to democratization—nationalism, legacy of the past—are discussed at the conclusion of the course.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/29/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40311
POLI_SCI 375-0 Comparative Politics of Business-Government Relations

In POL 375 we will explore how market-based economies work across different national settings. What distinguishes the German variety of capitalism from the British or American varieties? Are national models converging on a single type or do big differences remain? What are the main dimensions along which national varieties of capitalism differ? Are there systematic differences in how business and government work together that distinguish the successful developers (like South Korea and, more recently, China) from the stalled economies (like Russia)? Was the global financial crisis of 2008 driven by the excessive power of the financial sector in the United States and, if so, how did finance become so powerful?
Political Science 375 is split into five related topics. We start with different perspectives on the relative merits of two different organizing principles for any economy: authoritative/state-driven and decentralized/market-driven. In this section we will discuss whether governments should get out of firms' way and allow price signals to shape business decisions or whether successful collaboration between states and firms is possible. Next, we develop the idea of “institutional complementarities” in the context of the advanced industrial democracies. Germany, the archetypal “coordinated market economy” is compared to the United States, the archetypal “liberal market economy.” We will discuss whether there is a relationship between the political power of business groups and the increasing level of income inequality in the United States. From there we move to the third topic: the divergent trajectories of state-led development efforts in Northeast Asia and South America. How does the business-government relationship differ in these regions? The fourth topic concerns patterns of business-government relations in the countries have undergone transition from command to market economies (with a particular focus on Russia and China). The tour of comparative capitalisms returns to the United States in the concluding part of the course. The fifth topic is organized around the financial crisis of 2008 and the expanding role of the financial sector in the American economy.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/31/14 MTuTh 10 – 11:45 a.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41907
POLI_SCI 390-0 History of Chicago Politics

How did Chicago become one of the most corrupt cities in the history of America? This course thoroughly examines the entire history of Chicago politics and corruption within that context, using Chicago as a classic case study. The course covers from the time Chicago elected its first mayor, William Ogden, through the devastation of the Chicago fire, exploitive and oppressive businessmen, attempts at early 20th-century reform, an era of nefarious and often unscrupulous aldermen known as Grey Wolves, the roaring 1920s of mafia influence under Mayor "Big Bill" Thompson, creation and building of Chicago's political machine under Mayors Cermak and Kelly, examination of the absolute power of Mayor Richard J. Daley, the record serving term of Mayor Richard M. Daley, and concludes with observations of more recent unethical city council practices and Chicago's new mayor. Throughout the course, empirical data and anecdotal stories derived from the instructor's aldermanic campaign and years of community activism will be presented as it relates to the topics under discussion. This also counts as a Weinberg College 300 level for the Political Science major. Please Note: the first class is mandatory.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/26/14 - 08/14/14 Th 6 – 9:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40239
POLI_SCI 390-0 America in the 1960's: Politics of Popular Culture

America in the 1960s has often been called a revolutionary era. It was certainly a time of turmoil. What generated this critical era? Was it the demand for citizenship rights? Was it rooted in some version of Marxist or Post Marxist ideology? What was the role of popular culture, music, drugs, hippiedom etc. in this period? The critical question, however, is whether this was a period of revolution or a carefully played out moment of capitalist readjustment to lessen potential tensions in American society. Readings will focus on primary texts in the areas of race, gender, Vietnam, and advertising. Assignments will consist of a take home midterm, take home final, and short book review.

Summer 2014 Sec #36
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6 – 8:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40200
Psychology
PSYCH 110-0 Introduction to Psychology

The purpose of this course is to give an overview of the field of psychology. Class lectures, readings, demonstrations, and discussions will combine to give you a sense of the scientific study of psychology across many areas of inquiry. Ultimately, the goal of this course is to provide you with an enhanced evidence-based understanding of the fundamentals of behavior, thought, and human nature. Prerequisite: none. This course counts toward the Weinberg College social and behavioral sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40027
PSYCH 201-0 Statistical Methods in Psychology

This course is designed to introduce you to statistics, including both descriptive statistics (summarizing data obtained from a sample) and inferential statistics (drawing inferences about a population based on data obtained from a sample drawn from that population). The assigned readings have been selected to familiarize students with basic concepts relating to the analysis and interpretation of data. Class activities will focus on how the concepts can be applied. Through completion of the course, students should become more sophisticated and critical consumers of statistical information. Prerequisite: high school algebra and PSYCH 110 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40028
PSYCH 204-0 Social Psychology

This course gives a general overview of the field of social psychology. Through reading and discussion, you will gain a broad sense of current issues in social psychology, as well as deeper insight into specific avenues of study. Emphasis will be placed on an evidence-based approach to the study of how an individual relates to his or her social environment. The course will not be very technical, but you will leave with a sense of how to interpret popular scientific research in social psychology and how to link this research to psychological phenomena in the real world. Prerequisite: PSYCH 110 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Weinberg College social and behavioral sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40029
PSYCH 204-CN Social Psychology

This course examines psychological processes in social behavior, including thinking about and interacting with other people and groups, as well as the effects of social and cognitive processes on the ways individuals perceive, influence, and relate to others. Topics include person perception, the self, prejudice and stereotyping, social identity, attitudes and attitude change, conformity, interpersonal attraction, altruism, aggression, group processes. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. This course is open to Leadership and Organization Behavior year one cohort students only. First class attendance is mandatory. LOB students only

Summer 2014 Sec #25
06/28/14 - 07/26/14 Sa 1:30 – 5 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41015
PSYCH 205-0 Research Methods in Psychology

This course provides an introduction to psychological research techniques and methodology. Topics to be covered include the logic of research, the issues that must be considered in deciding how to study various psychological phenomena, and ways to address the difficulties posed by the limitations of specific studies. Ways for assessing threats to the internal and external validity of studies will be examined. These issues will be illustrated through reference to examples of research on various topics in psychology. In addition to lectures and readings, students will participate actively in the design and analysis of several research projects. Students will also learn to write research reports in the style used by research psychologists. Prerequisite: Psych 110 or equivalent and Psych 201 or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40084
PSYCH 212-0 Introduction to Neuroscience

The purpose of this course is to provide a broad overview of the current state of neuroscience as a field. Students will gain an understanding of brain functioning from the cellular level to the systems level. Major areas of cognition will be discussed from a neurological perspective in order to explain how brain functioning gives rise to everyday behavior, thinking and decision making. The areas that will be covered include, but are not limited to, brain anatomy, perception, memory, language, thought, consciousness, morality, and brain disorders. Lecture will be the primary teaching tool used, though discussion will also be a significant portion of the class. Grades will be assessed via tests (multiple choice and essay) as well as with writing assignments. Students who are intrigued by how the the brain underpins the impressive diversity of skills and processes that humans demonstrate everyday are strongly encouraged to enroll. At the heart of this course is a curiosity and yearning to understand the biological and scientific basis for the majesty of human experience. This course counts toward the Natural Sciences distribution requirement, Area I.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6 – 8:30 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40292
PSYCH 228-0 Cognitive Psychology

How do we perceive, remember, reason, and communicate about our experiences as we go about our lives? This course is an introduction to cognitive psychology, the study of how the mind represents and processes information about the world. The course will cover topics such as perception, attention, memory, knowledge representation, language, reasoning, problem solving, and decision-making. Classes consist of lectures, in-class demonstrations, and discussion. Students learn to think critically about the assumptions and methods underlying research in cognition. Students gain an understanding of scientific debates about how the mind works, read original empirical research papers, and participate in demonstrations of experiments. Prerequisite: PSYCH 110 or equivalent. This course counts toward the Social and Behavioral Sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2014 Sec #24
06/23/14 - 07/16/14 MW 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40177
PSYCH 303-0 Psychopathology

This course will provide an introduction to the major categories of maladaptive behavior/psychological distress and related research findings. Goals/topics include encouraging thoughtful and critical evaluation of the DSM and other systems of classification, exploring etiological theories and how these views have changed throughout recent history, developing critical thinking skills through the study of several controversial issues in abnormal psychology, and emphasizing the human face of psychological distress through case studies, readings, and videos. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. This course counts toward the Social and Behavioral Sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40146
PSYCH 306-0 Introduction to Clinical Psychology

This course will introduce major concepts and methods of clinical psychology. The course will emphasize four main areas relevant to clinical psychology: (1) history of clinical psychology, (2) psychological assessment, (3) overview of modern psychotherapies, and (4) empirical research on psychotherapeutic interventions. Ethical issues as they relate to the field will also be discussed. Psych 303 (Psychopathology) is recommended before taking this course, but not required. This course counts toward the Social and Behavioral Sciences distribution requirement, Area III.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41908
PSYCH 314-0 Special Topics: Behavior Genetics & Evolutionary Psychology

This class is an overview of two related disciplines: behavior genetics and evolutionary psychology. The first weeks of the class will address methods and findings in behavior genetics, focusing primarily on twin, family, and adoption designs, but also addressing contemporary molecular methods. The second half of the class will focus on topics in evolutionary psychology including the evolution of mate preferences, violence, morality, and their application to life. Registration Requirements: Psychology 110 Learning Objectives: Students will be familiar with the methods to study the importance of genetics and environment to variation in behavioral traits. They will also be conversant with the major ideas of contemporary evolutionary psychology. Evaluation Method2 midterm exams (no final exam) Class Materials (Required) How Genes Influence Behavior (2010); by J. Flint, R. J. Greenspan, & K. S. Kendler. (ISBN 978-0-19-955990-9). Additional readings posted online. 

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6 – 8:30 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40152
PSYCH 314-0 Culture and Cognition

This course explores the cultural foundations of cognition. How do cultural environments structure and orient our conceptual knowledge about the world, and how do these cognitive processes feedback into cultural systems? Key topics include conceptual development, knowledge organization, causal reasoning, and moral and environmental decision making. Jointly, the topics are integrated through a focus on social and ecological cognition. Students will engage in cultural artifact analyses, field experiences, and research inquiries. By the end of the course, students will have a deeper knowledge of concepts, culture, and their interaction, and will be aware of the broader cultural frameworks that shape these very scientific inquiries. Introduction to Psychology (PSYCH 110) is a prerequisite for this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #34
06/24/14 - 07/17/14 TuTh 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40293
PSYCH 324-0 Perception

Overview of class: An introduction to human perception with a strong emphasis on visual perception. This course evaluates the current understanding of how neural activity in the brain allows people to perceive basic sensory features (e.g., brightness, color, size, position, depth, movement, loudness and pitch) as well as recognize and discriminate complex perceptual patterns (e.g., 2D-shapes, 3D-objects, faces, scenes, and musical sequences). The underlying mechanisms are discussed on the basis of behavioral, neurophysiological, and computational evidence. Registration Requirements: Introductory Psychology (110). Teaching Method: Lectures and possibly student presentations. Evaluation Method: A midterm exam, a final exam, a short paper, and possibly a final presentation. Class Materials (Not Required): "Perception" by Robert Sekuler and Randolph Blake (the primary textbook); Lecture notes. This course counts toward the Weinberg College natural sciences distribution requirement, Area I and social and behavioral sciences, Area lll.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/25/14 - 08/13/14 W 5:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40294
Religion
RELIGION 170-0 Religion in Human Experience

This course has three main goals: (1) It will provide an introduction to Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students should gain a basic “literacy” in each of these traditions; (2) It will encourage students to become comfortable thinking analytically about religion. The course will discuss how various scholars have understood what religion “is,” and explore several lenses through which they analyze it (mythology; ritual, worship and sacred space; prayer and meditation; morality, ethics, and politics; and gender and sexuality); (3) Students will apply their religious literacy, along with their newfound analytic skills to identify similarities, but also differences between and among religious traditions. The course will consist of an in-class midterm and an in-class final.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/18/14 MWF 12:30 – 3 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40185
RELIGION 210-0 Introduction to Buddhism

This course will be an introduction, suitable for beginners and others, of Buddhism, the philosophy and religion that began in India some 2500 years ago and now exists in almost all parts of the world. Buddhism has shaped the thought and culture of Asia and has also influenced Western thought and culture in significant ways. In this class we will examine some of the forms of this diverse tradition. One emphasis will be on investigating the philosophical and religious teachings of Gautama the Buddha in India as well as the history and thought of later Buddhists in other parts of Asia. We will explore Buddhism’s system of values, its interpretation of existence, and its several systems of meditation and practices that the Buddhists have employed to find meaning in life.
6WKS

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40296
RELIGION 230-0 Introduction to Judaism

Course Description: This course attempts to answer the questions "What is Judaism?" and "Who is a Jew?" by surveying the broad arc of Jewish history, reviewing the practices and beliefs that have defined and continue to define Judaism as a religion, sampling the vast treasure of Jewish literatures, and analyzing the unique social conditions that have made the cultural experience of Jewishness so significant. The class will employ a historical structure to trace the evolutions of Jewish literature, religion, and culture through the ages. This course counts toward the Weinberg College ethics and values distribution requirement, Area V.
8WKS

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 08/13/14 MW 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40180
Radio/ Television/ Film
RTVF 260-0 Foundations of Screenwriting

An introduction to screenwriting: Students will develop, revise, and polish a twelve to fifteen page script. As preparation, lectures will include visual storytelling, characterization, dialogue, plot development, suspense, screenplay formatting, and working in Los Angeles. Class discussion will include clips and script excerpts from films such as The Shawshank Redemption, American Beauty, The Bourne Identity, and Little Miss Sunshine; and award-winning shorts as well.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40826
RTVF 298-0 Media Topics: Summer at the Movies

This course introduces students to the basics of film language and provides them with the critical tools to analyze film. Students are expected to attend a weekly movie playing at a local Chicago theater and to write a weekly film critique.

Class Materials (Required)
Looking at Movies by Richard Barsam, 4th edition.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 40943
RTVF 298-0 Studies in Media Topics: Disney Studies

Despite the Walt Disney Company's massive media presence today, little attention is paid to the rich history which built it, dating all the way back to its origins as Laugh 0 Gram Studios in Kansas City during the 1920s What visible glimpses we have today tend to be shaped by the market Imperatives of corporate re branding and the sentimental simplicity of nostalgic hazes. As such, this course will focus on the many ups and downs over the decades of Disney's slow aesthetic, economic, and cultural growth, providing a foundation for better understanding the company today.

In addition to analyzing particular Disney texts (some well -known and many not well known), special emphasis will be paid to the many facets or the studio's first critical and commercial success in the 1930s, its struggles with bankruptcy throughout the 1940s, and its hugely successful re -branding as a prominent component of a new post-war leisure culture in the 1950s and 1960s. Extensive attention will also be paid to the company's considerable revival and expansion under the "Team Disney" leadership of the 1980s and 1990s, as well as some reflection on the recent investment in once-competing brands such as Pixar, Marvel and Lucas film. This course is designed as a smaller scale class for a limited number of freshmen and sophomores, which thus will require active and informed participation from all students who enroll. For instance, every student will be expected to lead discussion on a designated course reading during an assigned day Students should also note that less attention will be paid to the Disney theme parks which will be more fully explored in a separate course on "vacation" narratives in the spring quarter.

 

 

Summer 2014 Sec #36
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41909
RTVF 360-0 Topics in Screenwriting: Writing the Short Film

Short films include many styles and genres. All of them will be covered in this course. Particular attention will be paid to the distinction between director-driven shorts (which commonly rely on strong visual imagery and a punch line or ironic twist ending) and script-driven, narrative stories (which focus more on character and plot development, though limited due to time constraints). By the end of this course, students will create a short film script, eight to twelve pages long, that includes compelling cinematic elements along with a well-developed narrative structure. On the film festival circuit, this is the type of "calling card" short film that producers and investors like to see when they evaluate whether a filmmaker has the skills to make the jump from shorts to features.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40945
RTVF 379-0 Topics in F/V/A Production: DIY Filmmaking

DIY filmmaking: With the advent of digital technologies, increasingly sophisticated media equipment is becoming accessible to everyone. It is not uncommon for many individuals to have an HD camera on their smart phone, and software to do non-linear digital editing on their laptops. This proliferation of movie making equipment allows anyone to create and distribute their own f ilms independently. New directors conceptualize, write, shoot, edit, compose music and distribute t he work themselves. These one person do it yourself filmmakers are creating new forms of engaging with audiences that ignore all the traditional rules. This class will examine the process of creating and distributing a Do It Yourself film with easily accessible equipment. Topics covered will include scripting, storyboarding, pre-production, producing, shooting, editing, sound, music and distribution.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41910
RTVF 398-0 Mindy Goes to Hollywood: Asian Americans, Performance and Humor

This course explores “humorous” representations of Asian Americans in popular culture. Instead of interrogating what constitutes an “acceptable” representation, we will instead investigate the politics embedded in “funny” portrayals of Asian-American-ness. When is it ok to laugh and who gets to do it? These questions obviously don’t have firm answers, but we will consider them throughout the course. The question, of ‘who’ is key here, as we will begin with how the category ‘Asian American’ has been defined. Our discussion of ‘who’ necessarily relates the formation of ‘Asian American’ to other racial groups, and Asian American humor to racial and ethnic humor. We will investigate this relationality by studying how Asian American representations have changed throughout the 20th century and into the 21st by looking at print media, live action films, animation, television, and web video. We consider how humor is intended in representations of Asian Americans performed by people of other races via visual or vocal yellowface or brownface. Though these racial masquerades occur more in the first part of the course, which discusses the pre-WII period, we will note the persistence of these performance tactics in the 20th and 21st centuries. Finally, as Asian Americans get more visibility and authorship in the media industries in the late 20th century and into the 21st, we will look at how they perform and parody ‘Asian American-ness’ while also referencing other racial identities.


Additional Information:

SAMPLE READINGS

Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic (Henri Bergson); /lollywood Goes Oriental: CaucAsian Performance in American Film (Karl a Rae Fuller); Hollywood Asian: Philip Ahn and the Politics of Cross-Ethnic Performance (Hye Seung Ch ung); Cold War Orienta/ism: Asia in the Middlebrow Imagination,1945-1961 (Christina Klein); Karma Cola: Marketing the Mystic East (Gita Mehta); Everybody Was Kung Fu Fighting: Afro-Asian Connections and the Myth of Cultural Purity (Vijay Prashad); Laughing Mad: The Black Comic Persona in Post­ Soul America (Bambi Haggins); Monitored Peril: Asian Americans and the Politics of TV Representation (Darrell Y. Hamamoto); "Apu's Brown Voice: Cultural Inflection and South Asian Accents" (Shilpa Dave); "'Where's My Parade?' Margaret Cho and the Asian American Body in Space" (Rachel C. Lee); "No laughing matter? Comedy and the Poli tics of the Terrorist/Victim" (Nina Seja); Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me (And Other Concerns) (Mindy Kaling); "How It Feels to Be Viral Me: Affective Labor and Asian American YouTube Performance" (Christine Bacareza Balance); "Secret Asian Man: Angry Asians an d the Politics of Cultural Visibility" (Tasha G. Oren)

SAMPLE SCREENINGS

Fakin' da Funk, Slaying the Dragon, International House, Geisha Boy, Flower Drum Song, The Dinah Shore Chevy Show, The jack Benny Show, The Frank Sinatra Show,Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, Help!, Black Belt jones, Enter the Dragon, Kung Fu, Sixteen Candles, I'm the One That I Want,All American Girl, The Office (US), The Mindy Project, Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay, IT HAS BEGUN: BANANAPOCALYPSE.TheTruth with Hasan Minhaj, Totally Biased with W Kamau Bell, Intimate Moments for a Sensual Evening

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40854
Education: Field Studies
SESP 114-0 Summer Internship

For more information about this summer internship, please contact the School of Education and Social Policy, 847-491-3790 or sesp@northwestern.edu.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/23/14 - 08/29/14 MTuWThF Time: TBA
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41369
Slavic Languages and Literature
SLAVIC 106-SA Elementary Czech

This course is taught in Prague; for more information, please call Study Abroad Office at 847.467.6400.

The course is designed to give students the ability to handle everyday situations in Czech by focusing on speaking, listening, and reading comprehension. The course also introduces Czech grammar and basic writing skills.

Summer 2014 Sec #27
06/23/14 - 08/29/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40037
SLAVIC 267-SA Modern Czech Film: History on Screen

This course is taught in Prague; for more information, please call Study Abroad Office at 847.467.6400.

The course provides insight into the issues that shaped historical and sociocultural developments in Czechoslovakia through an examination of major feature films and documentaries. Students will gain a deep understanding of the unique central European experience of modernity through the work of famous filmmakers, including such directors as Academy Award laureates Milos Forman and Jiøí Menzel. Screenings will include films covering World War II, the Stalinist era, the period of political and cultural thaw of the 1960s, the post-1968 Soviet invasion years, as well as the trends and controversies that stemmed from the post-1989 Velvet Revolution. This course counts toward the Weinberg College literature and fine arts distribution requirement, Area VI.

Summer 2014 Sec #27
06/23/14 - 08/29/14 Days: TBA Time: TBA
Off Campus Campus Open Caesar ID: 40036
Sociology
SOCIOL 110-0 Introduction to Sociology

Essential characteristics of group life. Interrelations of society, culture, and personality. Basic institutions and processes.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40273
SOCIOL 202-0 Sociol Problems

Emergence of social problems. How the media, politicians, lawmakers, and others define social issues. How lives and self-images are shaped when people are connected to a social problem.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 9:30 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41884
SOCIOL 216-0 Gender and Society

This course introduces students to core themes in the social-scientific analysis of gender. This course examines the creation and reproduction of gender identities, gender ideologies, and gender-based social institutions in American society. A central focus of the course is on the construction of gender and sexuality as meaningful social categories. We will explore the varieties of ways that social scientists have analyzed gender roles and relations, including socialstructural, cultural, and biological perspectives; the intersections of gender, race, and class as social identities; gender and bodies; gender, power, and sexual violence; gender and sexuality; and the economic and political circumstances of family life in contemporary society.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41885
SOCIOL 220-0 Health, Biomedicine Culture and Society

Present-day medicine and health care are flashpoints for a bewildering array of controversies-about whose interests the health care system should serve and how it should be organized; about the trustworthiness of the medical knowledge we rely on when we are confronted with the threat of illness; about the politics and ethics of biomedical research; about whether health care can be made affordable; about how the benefits of good health can be shared equitably across lines of social class, race, and gender; and about the proper roles of health professionals, scientists, patients, activists, and the state in establishing medical, political, and ethical priorities. By providing a broad introduction to the domain of health and biomedicine, this course will take up such controversies as matters of concern to all. We will analyze the cultural meanings associated with health and illness; the political controversies surrounding health care, medical knowledge production, and medical decision-making; and the structure of the social institutions that comprise the health care industry. We will examine many problems with the current state of health and health care in the United States, and we will also consider potential solutions.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 9:30 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open
SOCIOL 226-CN Sociological Analysis

This course explores the logic and methods of social research, qualitative and quantitative analysis of social data, and ethical, political, and policy issues in social research, and provides foundation for further work in social research. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. This course is open to Leadership and Organization Behavior year two cohort students only. First class attendance is mandatory. LOB students only

Summer 2014 Sec #25
06/28/14 - 07/26/14 Sa 1:30 – 5 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41029
SOCIOL 302-0 Sociology of Organizations

Structure and function of formal organizations, especially in business and government. Stratification, social control, and conflict. Discretion, rules, and information in achieving goals. Modes of participation. Development of informal norms. Prerequisite: 100 or 200-level sociology course. This course counts toward the Weinberg College social and behavioral sciences distribution requirement.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 9:30 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40186
SOCIOL 302-CN Sociology of Organizations

This course examines the structure and function of formal organizations, especially in business and government. Topics include stratification, social control, conflict, discretion, rules, information in achieving goals, and modes of participation. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. This course is open to Leadership and Organization Behavior year two cohort students only. First class attendance is mandatory. LOB students only

Summer 2014 Sec #25
06/28/14 - 07/26/14 Sa 1:30 – 5 p.m.
Chicago Campus Open Caesar ID: 41028
SOCIOL 314-0 Sociology of Religion

Sociological approach to the study of American religion. Communities, practices, race, gender, and politics in the shaping of religion.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 1 – 3:30 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41887
SOCIOL 376-0 Special Topics: Sexuality and the City

GAYS AND GENTRIFICATION: It is a relationship that pervades much of the scholarly and popular literature on gay communities; today, gay neighborhoods have emerged as a vital part of cities around the world. However, this relationship tends to obscure more than it illuminates. This course focuses on the oft-ignored dimension of sexual orientation and how it physically and culturally shapes cities and city life. Drawing on readings from a variety of disciplines, we will first examine the features of urbanism that facilitated the emergence and proliferation of LGBT communities in American cities. From there, we will focus our attention to gay and lesbian neighborhoods, investigating the factors that promoted these spaces as harbingers of urban renewal. Finally, we will broaden our focus, considering the relevance and impacts of gay/lesbian neighborhoods in a world of increasing tolerance and visibility for LGBT citizens. Students will be required to apply course readings and concepts to contemporary problems plaguing LGBT communities in American cities. Assignments include two short (3 - 5 pp) analytic position papers and a project exploring the relationship between urbanism and youth. COURSE TEXTS INCLUDE Tearoom Trade: Impersonal Sex in Public Places by Laud Humphreys; Creating a Place for Ourselves, edited by Brett Beemyn.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 9:30 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40230
Spanish
SPANISH 101-1 Elementary Spanish

The first course in a three-course sequence based on the communicative method. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary building, listening comprehension, speaking, and gaining grammar skills through context.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/23/14 - 07/11/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40030
SPANISH 101-2 Elementary Spanish

The second course in a three-course sequence based on the communicative method. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary building, listening comprehension, speaking, and gaining grammar skills through context. Prerequisite: SPANISH 101-1 or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40031
SPANISH 101-3 Elementary Spanish

The third course in a three-course sequence based on the communicative method. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary building, listening comprehension, speaking, and gaining grammar skills through context. Prerequisite: SPANISH 101-2 or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40032
SPANISH 121-1 Intermediate Spanish

The first course in the intermediate level three-course sequence. This course emphasizes communication in meaningful contexts and further development of grammar and vocabulary through reading modern Spanish prose, speaking and writing. An audio-visual component further develops listening comprehension. Prerequisite: Spanish 101-3, 115-2, or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
06/01/14 - 08/31/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40033
SPANISH 121-2 Intermediate Spanish

The second course in the intermediate level three-course sequence. This course emphasizes communication in meaningful contexts and further development of grammar and vocabulary through reading modern Spanish prose, speaking and writing. An audio-visual component further develops listening comprehension. Prerequisite: Spanish 121-1 or equivalent.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
07/14/14 - 08/01/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40034
SPANISH 121-3 Intermediate Spanish

The third course in the intermediate level three-course sequence. This course emphasizes communication in meaningful contexts and further development of grammar and vocabulary through reading modern Spanish prose, speaking and writing. An audio-visual component further develops listening comprehension. Prerequisite: Spanish 121-2 or equivalent. Completion of 121-3 with a C- or better fulfills the WCAS language requirement.

Summer 2014 Sec #23
08/04/14 - 08/22/14 MTuWThF 9 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40035
Statistics
STAT 202-CN Introduction to Statistics

Data collection and summarization, random variables, correlation, regression, probability, sampling, estimation, tests of significance, and two-sample comparisons. Does not require calculus and makes minimal use of formal mathematics. Examples taken from newspapers and other real-world sources. Familiarity with Microsoft Excel is recommended. The computer is used as a tool to enhance students' ability to analyze and interpret data collected. This course combines classroom lecture and discussion with an online component. Students must have ready access to the Internet. Northwestern day-school students must obtain their dean's consent to enroll in this course.

Summer 2014 Sec #25
06/26/14 - 07/24/14 Th 6 – 9 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41014
STAT 210-0 Introduction to Statistics for The Social Sciences

This introduction to statistics covers elementary probability theory, descriptive statistics, sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing--all frequently used in many social science, physical science, and engineering disciplines. This course counts toward the Weinberg College formal studies distribution requirement, Area II.

Summer 2014 Sec #20
06/23/14 - 07/18/14 MWF 10 a.m. – noon
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40197
Theatre
THEATRE 242-0 Stage Makeup

In this lecture, demonstration, and application course, students learn the principles of makeup design and execution for the stage. Students are not required to have any prior makeup training or knowledge, only a willingness to learn. This class has a course fee of $10. This course will meet in Barber Theatre Makeup Room. Enrollment limited to 14.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 11:30 a.m. – 1:50 p.m. TIC Barber Makeup
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40849
THEATRE 312-1 The Art of Storytelling

This course is designed for teachers, librarians, actors, clergy, and anyone eager to explore the potential of storytelling in life and work. The class examines oral traditions and the current renaissance of storytelling in a nurturing, supportive environment. Experiential in nature, the course is designed to empower participants to discover their own authentic styles as they gain confidence as tellers of stories. Attendance at the first class is required. Enrollment limited to 16.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 9 – 11:20 a.m. TIC South Studio
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40828
THEATRE 330-0 Special Topics in Theatre: Monologue: The Private Moment Onstage

A fast paced class, covering a range of monologues from classical and contemporary texts. This class offers an opportunity to amass eight to ten monologues. The class covers skills in how to choose and prepare a monologue for use in a play and audition setting. This class is open to students of all levels of experience, however, strong discipline is required. Maximum number of students: 16

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 9 – 11:20 a.m. TIC South
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40859
THEATRE 330-0 Voice For Music Theatre

This course will provide students the building blocks of vocal technique in music theatre: proper breathing, breath management and support, vocal health, singer's diction, intonation, and "break management" (see: passagios). We will explore many different styles of music theatre singing including American standards, Rodgers and Hammerstein, character songs, power ballads, and pop/rock. The focus of this course is not audition technique or book building, but establishing a strong foundation of vocal technique from which you can grow.

Summer 2014 Sec #28
06/24/14 - 08/14/14 TuTh noon – 1:50 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41881
THEATRE 330-0 Special Topics: Arts Leadership & Theatre Management

This highly participatory and collaborative seminar offers students a broad overview of arts leadership and theatre management in America today, and also exposes students to arts leaders working at theatres locally and throughout the country. Students will meet Chicago theatre leaders and hear from these leaders about their artistic impulses and processes, creative ambitions and goals, successes, as well as their dreams for the future. Students will develop artistic leadership research projects and present their research in class, including arts leadership styles and strategies, and the impact of these styles on artists’ own lives as well as on the work they create and the companies they run. The class will include a survey of leadership and management theory and its applicability in theatre. Students will also create a “paper theatre project” that will include making choices, decisions and presentations about the processes involved in producing a play or musical. This course will have resonance for any student who has ever produced his/her own show as well as for students who are beginning to think about producing and/or starting their own theatres upon graduating from Northwestern. Enrollment limited to 12.

Summer 2014 Sec #56
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 11 a.m. – 1:20 p.m. TIC East Conference
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40950
THEATRE 330-0 Special Topics: Introduction to Playwriting

An introduction to the art and craft of writing for the stage. Students will read the work of established playwrights (dead AND alive), attempt various styles and techniques themselves and ultimately craft the first portion of an original play. An excellent course for beginning writers as well as students who have dabbled in the craft before. Enrollment limited to 10.

Summer 2014 Sec #66
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 10 a.m. – 12:20 p.m. Fisk 115
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40951
THEATRE 330-0 Effective Communication Skills: Presentation and Presence

The class is intended to meet the growing needs of students as they approach graduation and the working demands of a professional life, especially those in leadership roles, sales and public relations positions which will include public presentations, client relations, sales and media appearances. The course is derived and built upon what actors know about communication. For an actor, repetition through performance, the constant opportunity during training to analyze a text, interpret meaning and actively listen all ensure that he/she become an agile speaker and dynamic participant within a team, meeting room, or vast auditorium.

Summer 2014 Sec #76
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW noon – 2:20 p.m.
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41882
THEATRE 348-1 Creative Drama

This course, especially appropriate for teachers, is designed to foster understanding of the principles and practices of improvised drama as a tool for discovery. Since creative drama can be deployed in many areas (teaching, performance, therapy, writing, recreation, etc.), this course will allow participants to explore the use of creative drama in their lives and work. Special emphasis will be placed on nurturing the creative efforts and risks of participants and on empowering participants to guide others in the work of creative drama. Taught by nationally acclaimed visiting drama specialist Betsy Quinn, the course features interaction with young people from the area. Enrollment limited to 20.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/23/14 - 07/30/14 MW 2:30 – 4:50 p.m. TIC South 127
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 40948
THEATRE 366-0 Latino Theatre

This course is designed to introduce the student to a cross-section of contemporary Latino plays, a general history of Latino theatre in the U.S. and current trends in Latino Theatre, including the place of translation in the Latino Theatre field. The course will provide an overview of the state of professional Latino theatre and its impact on and place in the broader American professional theatre. The class will be partly the reading of dramatic literature, along with critical analysis and discussion, and partly performance. The class culminates in final scene and monologue performances, and a critical paper that engages a shared theme across two plays of the students’ selection.

The objective of this course is to introduce students of all cultural and ethnic backgrounds to the wealth of contemporary Latino plays in the United States and to provide them the opportunity to explore a culture that is possibly different from their own through dramatic literature. The goal of this class is to have the student gain a considerable knowledge of the state of contemporary Latino theatre in the United States by investigating a cross-section of plays that represent the diversity of communities represented under the term “Latina/o”, and to acquire sensitivity toward, and appreciation of Latino Culture. Through reading, discussion, attending theatre performances, and connecting with playwrights of works studied during the summer via Skype, students will have the opportunity to explore the diversity of Latina/o culture within a safe and inclusive creative space. While acting experience is not required and “talent” is judged as relative, 100% investment is always expected.

Summer 2014 Sec #26
06/24/14 - 07/31/14 TuTh 11 a.m. – 1:20 p.m. Fisk 115
Evanston Campus Open Caesar ID: 41883